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i'm using visual studio 2010 and when i do something like

for(int i = 0, j = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
        if(m_Var == 1)
            j++;
}

if(j == 0)//This line errors undeclared identifier
    DoSomething();

I have declared j in the for loop so why is it erroring "undeclared identifier"?

another example would be

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
        m_Var1++;
}

for(i = 0; i < 200; i++)//This line errors undeclared identifier
{
        m_Var2++;
}

that code errors even though it is declared in the for loop, but why? is there a way to do this without having to declare i BEFORE the loop but declare it within the loop instead like in the above examples?

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For your second example, defining i in both loops is better style anyway. –  Keith Thompson Aug 28 '12 at 9:06

5 Answers 5

In the first example, j only exists in the scope of the loop

for(int i = 0, j = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
        if(m_Var == 1) j++;
}  // i, j exist no longer

In the second example, the same applies to i. It's scope is the first loop. You can even check it without a loop:

{
  int i = 0;
} // end of scope, end of i

i++; // error, 
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Because you declare it in the loop so once the loop has finished, your j variable is out of scope. When you declare variables inside the for statement like this

for(int i = 0, j = 0; i < 10; i++) 

the variable only has loop scope.

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As I recall, some very early versions of C++ had variables defined in for loops scoped to the block containing the loop. In modern C++, the scope is restricted to the for loop itself. For example:

void foo() {
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i ++) {
        // i is visible here
    }
    // In very old C++, i is visible here.
    // In modern C++, i is not visible here.
}

Visual Studio actually has an option to enable the old behavior; you can turn off "Force Conformance in For Loop Scope", under Configuration Properties --> C/C++ --> Language. The corresponding compiler command-line option is /Zc:forScope-. But unless you specifically need this to compile old code that you can't afford to fix, I strongly recommend leaving it with the default setting, which conforms to the modern C++ rule. If you're writing new code, just follow the modern C++ rule. If you need a variable to be visible outside the loop, then declare it outside the loop.

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I have declared j in the for loop ...

Yes, you have. And you can only use it in that for loop, because its scope ends at the closing brace of that loop. You cannot use it after that.

If you want to use it afterwards, you must move the scope out a little bit, but not so far that it will affect other stuff (localisation is still a good thing). One method is to use block scope, something like:

{
    int i, j;                          // Scope starts here,
    for (i = 0, j = 0; i < 10; i++)
        if (m_Var == 1)
            j++;
    if (j == 0)                        // still exists here,
        DoSomething();
}                                      // and ends here.

This still limits i and j to a specific, small area, but allows j to "escape" from the if statement.

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1  
It's the scope of j, not its storage duration, that's relevant. –  Keith Thompson Aug 28 '12 at 8:55
    
Good point, Keith, even now, after three-plus decades of C coding, I sometimes get confused. Changed to fix. –  paxdiablo Aug 28 '12 at 8:58

c++ uses block scope for that variable - msdn docs

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