Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to simulate body-centered cubic crystal structure in Python using OpenGL. I have written code to get the next_nodes, print if the node satisfies the boundaries and look for next nodes recursively return otherwise.

But the code has some problem its running infinitely. Can anyone help me sort this problem. Posting the relevant code below (with all the OpenGL calls removed).

def get_node(x,y,z,side):
    return [x+side,y,z],[x,y+side,z],[x,y,z+side],[x-side,y,z],[x,y-side,z],[x,y,z-side]

def goto_next_nodes(x,y,z,cube_side,next_nodes,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z):
    for node in next_nodes:
        if 0<=node[0]<=boundary_x and 0<=node[1]<=boundary_y and 0<=node[2]<=boundary_z:
             print node
             x,y,z=node[0],node[1],node[2]
             next_nodes=get_node(x,y,z,cube_side)
             goto_next_nodes(x,y,z,cube_side,next_nodes,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z)
        else:
            return

def display_fcc(cube_side,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z):
     x=y=z=0
     next_nodes=get_node(x,y,z,cube_side)
     goto_next_nodes(x,y,z,cube_side,next_nodes,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z)

display_fcc(5,10,10,10)

The recursion starts in display_fcc function, goto_next_node is the recursive function.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Scharron, Deestan, tereško, Martin, bmargulies Aug 28 '12 at 18:42

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Please clean up your code. Remove the bits unrelated to the problem. –  Deestan Aug 28 '12 at 10:06
1  
What is the intent of goto_next_nodes? –  Deestan Aug 28 '12 at 10:20
    
Well, you know where the problem is (in goto_next_node). So try looking in that function whether there's something that could cause a recursion. Like, I dunno, calling the function again on the same arguments? Or trying to find the next node B of some node A which would turn out to be node A? You could use print statements to illustrate your x,y,z`,... –  Pierre GM Aug 28 '12 at 10:22
    
Why was this question closed? With some allowance for second-language difficulties, the question seems clear enough. The code attempts to implement a depth-first search of a graph of nodes on a face-centred cubic crystal structure, but the search doesn't terminate due to a bug. The OP wanted help finding the bug. –  Gareth Rees Sep 10 '12 at 15:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can memoize your seen nodes, and do not go there for second time, like this code. But I think you need to fix one more thing, the

else:
    return

is not correct I think, because your for will not iterate any more.

def get_node(x, y, z, side):
    return [(x+side,y,z), (x,y+side,z), (x,y,z+side),
            (x-side,y,z), (x,y-side,z), (x,y,z-side)]

seen_nodes = set()

def goto_next_nodes(x, y, z, cube_side, next_nodes, boundary_x, boundary_y, boundary_z):
    for node in next_nodes:
        if node not in seen_nodes:
            seen_nodes.add(node)
            if 0<=node[0]<=boundary_x and 0<=node[1]<=boundary_y and 0<=node[2]<=boundary_z:
                 print node
                 x,y,z=node[0],node[1],node[2]
                 next_nodes=get_node(x,y,z,cube_side)
                 goto_next_nodes(x,y,z,cube_side,next_nodes,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z)
    return

def display_fcc(cube_side,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z):
     x=y=z=0
     next_nodes=get_node(x,y,z,cube_side)
     goto_next_nodes(x,y,z,cube_side,next_nodes,boundary_x,boundary_y,boundary_z)

display_fcc(5,10,10,10)
share|improve this answer
1  
It would be better to use a set for seen_nodes and not a list, so that the membership test is O(1). –  Gareth Rees Aug 28 '12 at 10:40
    
@Gareth Rees Great comment, I had fixed my code, but as an extra hint, It's not O(1) It's O(log n) ;) –  MostafaR Aug 28 '12 at 11:13
    
@MostafaR This page claims it's O(1) average, but O(n) worst case. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 28 '12 at 11:16
    
@Gareth Rees Thanks for your answer, I thought that set in python is BST (like set in c++), but looks It's a Hash. –  MostafaR Aug 28 '12 at 12:17
2  
Lists are not hashable: you need something like seen_nodes.add(tuple(node)) or better still, represent your nodes as tuples throughout. –  Gareth Rees Aug 28 '12 at 13:39

Your next_node function returns all the nodes that are one step away from (x,y,z), and then in goto_next_node you go off to visit all the nodes that are within the boundary. But when you visit a node you never check to see if you have visited that node before. So your algorithm gets stuck in a corner and goes round and round, visiting a loop of nodes again and again and again. You can see this clearly if you look at the output:

>>> display_fcc(5,10,10,10)
[5, 0, 0]
[10, 0, 0]
[5, 5, 0]
[10, 5, 0]
[5, 10, 0]
[10, 10, 0]
[5, 5, 5]
[10, 5, 5]
[5, 10, 5]
[10, 10, 5]
[5, 5, 10]
[10, 5, 10]
[5, 10, 10]
[10, 10, 10]
[0, 5, 5]  
[5, 5, 5]      # Oops: we've been here before!
[10, 5, 5]
[5, 10, 5]
[10, 10, 5]
[5, 5, 10]
[10, 5, 10]
[5, 10, 10]
[10, 10, 10]
[0, 5, 5]
[5, 5, 5]      # And around we go again.
...

So you need to keep track of where you have been, and make sure you don't go there again.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that was the problem, I figured it out by looking the output after I got negative votes :) Anyway MostafaR 's answer is more elaborate, so I voted for it. Thanks :) –  pahnin Aug 28 '12 at 12:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.