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I have created a Guava CacheBuilder based cache with on expiry of 5 seconds if key is not written to. Have added a removalListener to it which prints the key/value pair being removed. What I have observed is that the onRemoval method of the listener gets called only the first time. It doesn't get called the second time an entry is removed. (The actual removal happens. Just the onRemoval method of the removalListener doesn't get called).

Am I doing something wrong? Can somebody help? Thanks in advance. Here's my code:

import java.util.Map;
import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

import com.google.common.cache.Cache;
import com.google.common.cache.CacheBuilder;
import com.google.common.cache.RemovalListener;
import com.google.common.cache.RemovalNotification;


public class TestCacheBuilder {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
      new TestCacheBuilder();
    }catch (Exception e){      
     e.printStackTrace(); 
    }
  }

  public TestCacheBuilder() {

    Cache<String, String> myCache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder()
        .expireAfterWrite(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
        .removalListener(new RemovalListener<String, String>() {
          public void onRemoval(RemovalNotification<String, String> removal) {
            System.out.println("removal: "+removal.getKey()+"/"+removal.getValue());
          }          
        })
        .build();


    Map<String, String> inMap = myCache.asMap();

    inMap.put("MyKey", "FirstValue");

    System.out.println("Initial Insert: "+inMap);

    //Wait 16 seconds

    try {
      Thread.sleep(4000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }

    System.out.println("After 4 seconds: " + inMap);

    inMap.put("MyKey", "SecondValue");

    try {
      Thread.sleep(1000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }

    System.out.println("After 1 more second: " + inMap);

    try {
      Thread.sleep(4000);
    } catch(InterruptedException ex) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }


    System.out.println("After 4 more seconds: " + inMap);

  }

}

The output is as below:

Initial Insert: {MyKey=FirstValue}
After 4 seconds: {MyKey=FirstValue}
removal: MyKey/FirstValue
After 1 more second: {MyKey=SecondValue}
After 4 more seconds: {}
share|improve this question
    
Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/10626720/… –  Frank Pavageau Aug 28 '12 at 11:34
1  
Aside from the actual question: you can enhance your tests by using the Ticker to simulate a clock that you can manipulate at your will (see here). That will speed up your tests and makes them resilient to subtle timing problems. –  Pyranja Aug 28 '12 at 11:41
    
Thanks Pyranja. Will definitely check that out ! –  Kiran Aug 28 '12 at 16:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The removal doesn't actually happen directly: Guava does not have its own cleaning thread to remove expired entries. The removals happen usually when there's a write in the same segment of the cache, or during a read when a certain amount of time has passed (to amortize the cost of the removal). However, while the entry is still there, it's seen as expired, which is why it's not printed.

Quoting CacheBuilder's javadoc:

If expireAfterWrite or expireAfterAccess is requested entries may be evicted on each cache modification, on occasional cache accesses, or on calls to Cache.cleanUp(). Expired entries may be counted in Cache.size(), but will never be visible to read or write operations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Frank. Cache.cleanUp() seems to do the trick. Just wondering it will have any performance implications if used often. The problem that I am facing is that I need the message when the cache entry gets removed as the system needs to do other things based on the removal. –  Kiran Aug 28 '12 at 16:02
    
@Kiran it depends on the access pattern of your cache. If it's called a lot, you'll add some contention when running Cache.cleanUp(). –  Frank Pavageau Aug 28 '12 at 16:25
1  
@Kiran: The more busy is your cache, the more clean up happens automatically, so during the rush hours you could probably switch off the manual cleanUp. OTOH, I believe to have seen that a single call to cleanUp did not remove all garbage. If this is really true, maybe you should consult the Guava guys. –  maaartinus Aug 28 '12 at 18:04
    
The logic is that cleanup happens automatically on occasional cache reads, on every cache write, or whenever Cache.cleanUp() is called. In your tests, I'd go ahead and call cleanUp(), but it shouldn't be necessary in production. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 28 '12 at 22:49
    
My rule of thumb: call Cache.cleanUp() liberally in tests; but avoid calling Cache.cleanUp() in production. The only exception I'm aware if is extremely low throughput caches with very large objects. After all, if your cache is actually being used, it will be cleaned up fast enough. –  fry Aug 29 '12 at 7:37

If expireAfterWrite or expireAfterAccess is requested, entries may be evicted on each cache modification, on occasional cache accesses, or on calls to Cache.cleanUp(). Expired entries may be counted in Cache.size(), but will never be visible to read or write operations.

In the long run, this will end-up eating all heap memory or lead to memory starvation for other modules which are not using any cache.

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