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I have the below code:

function Class () {
  this.method = function () {
    alert('method');
  };
}

new Class().method();

And it works fine, but as I understand, for each new object will be created the function. Is there right way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Place initialization of instance varibales into the Class function, and shared methods and variables in prototype property:

function Class (var1, var2) {
  this.var1 = var1;
  this.var2 = var2;
}

Class.prototype.method = function () {
  alert(this.var1 + ' ' + this.var2);
};

new Class('var1', 'var2').method();
​
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Totally correct, but be careful with assigning objects on the prototype, since they'll be shared amongst all instances. eg: Class.prototype.foo = [] –  nickf Aug 28 '12 at 10:19

My approach is almost identical to Speransky's, but I re-declare the prototype object instead of adding methods directly to it.

// Declare the Constructor function.
function MyClass (name, age) {

    // Assign any member properties here.
    this._name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

// Redefine the prototype object to add methods.
MyClass.prototype = {

    // Re-point the Constructor function as it will be overwritten.
    constructor: MyClass,

    // Custom method which all instances of `MyClass` will inherit.
    sayHello: function () { 
        return "My name is " + this._name + ", how do you do?";
    }
};

Usage:

var foo = new MyClass("Dave", 22);
foo.sayHello();     // "My name is Dave, how do you do?"
foo.age;            // 22

If you wanted to point the MyClass prototype at another object (to setup a simple inheritance model) then you could make use of a mixin, similar to Underscore's extend method:

function BaseClass(name) {
    this._name = name;
}

BaseClass.prototype = {
    constructor: BaseClass,

    sayHello: function () { 
        return "My name is " + this._name + ", how do you do?";
    }
}

class MyClass (name, age) {
    // Call the BaseClass constructor function in the context of `this`
    BaseClass.call(this, name);

    this.age = age;
}

// Mixin the BaseClass's protptype into the MyClass prototype and delcare
// the new methods.
_.extend(MyClass.Prototype, BaseClass.prototype, {
    constructor: MyClass,

    getAge: function () { 
        return this.age;
    }
});
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You don't loose __proto__ as it's auto-magically injected via browsers. As for it breaking inheritance; I've updated my example to show how you could take advantage of a Mixin. Personally, I try to avoid inheritance based architectures in JavaScript and favour composition instead. –  JonnyReeves Aug 28 '12 at 10:41

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