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In an effort to reduce mutability, should we rather use

public void setValues(String[] newVals) {

     this.vals = ( newVals == null ? null : newVals.clone() );
}

or

public void setValues(String[] newVals) {

     this.vals = ( newVals == null ? null : Arrays.copyOf(newVals, newVals.length) );
}
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1  
The above doesn't compile unless vals is Object vals. Otherwise, these are comparable approaches. clone is a simpler call (save for the ugly downcast). –  Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '12 at 10:24
1  
How about System.arrayCopy() (which will be faster than your 2 options)? –  assylias Aug 28 '12 at 10:24
    
@assylias Are you positive? clone should be at least as fast, it does a byte-for-byte copy of instance data. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '12 at 10:25
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1366303/… –  assylias Aug 28 '12 at 10:26
    
Possible dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/5821851/… –  nhahtdh Aug 28 '12 at 10:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I ran a quick test for performance: clone, System.arrayCopy and Arrays.copyOf have very similar performance (jdk 1.7.06, server vm).

For details (in ms), after JIT:

clone: 68
arrayCopy: 68
Arrays.copyOf: 68

Test code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException,
        IOException {
    int sum = 0;
    int[] warmup = new int[1];
    warmup[0] = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < 15000; i++) { // triggers JIT
        sum += copyClone(warmup);
        sum += copyArrayCopy(warmup);
        sum += copyCopyOf(warmup);
    }

    int count = 10_000_000;
    int[] array = new int[count];
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        array[i] = i;
    }

    // additional warmup for main
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        sum += copyArrayCopy(array);
    }
    System.gc();
    // copyClone
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        sum += copyClone(array);
    }
    long end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println("clone: " + (end - start) / 1000000);
    System.gc();
    // copyArrayCopy
    start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        sum += copyArrayCopy(array);
    }
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println("arrayCopy: " + (end - start) / 1000000);
    System.gc();
    // copyCopyOf
    start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        sum += copyCopyOf(array);
    }
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println("Arrays.copyOf: " + (end - start) / 1000000);
    // sum
    System.out.println(sum);
}

private static int copyClone(int[] array) {
    int[] copy = array.clone();
    return copy[copy.length - 1];
}

private static int copyArrayCopy(int[] array) {
    int[] copy = new int[array.length];
    System.arraycopy(array, 0, copy, 0, array.length);
    return copy[copy.length - 1];
}

private static int copyCopyOf(int[] array) {
    int[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(array, array.length);
    return copy[copy.length - 1];
}
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2  
... and the conclusion is that clone() is the best option, being a nilary method (no parameters to screw up) which also is as typesafe as it can get (thanks to return type covariance on clone() for array types). –  gustafc Aug 28 '12 at 13:42
    
There is a junit plugin for doing benchmarks like this from Carrot Search Labs - JUnitBenchmarks. It makes creating micro benchmarks like this very easy. –  C. Trimble Dec 20 '12 at 15:23
    
@C.Trimble I have used caliper in the past and it works well. –  assylias Dec 20 '12 at 15:27
    
@assylias I just read the caliper docs and it looks very interesting. –  C. Trimble Dec 20 '12 at 23:50

I written a simple program to check the difference.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, InterruptedException,
        PrinterException
{
  //Verify array remains immutable.

  String[] str =  {"a","b","c"};
  String[] strings  = str.clone();
  //change returned array
  strings[2]= "d";
  System.out.println(Arrays.toString(str));
  System.out.println(Arrays.toString(strings));

  String[] stringsCopy = Arrays.copyOf(str, str.length);
  stringsCopy[2]= "d";
  System.out.println(Arrays.toString(str));
  System.out.println(Arrays.toString(stringsCopy));

  //peformance
  long before = System.currentTimeMillis();
  for(int i=0;i<Integer.MAX_VALUE;i++)
  {
      str.clone();
  }
  System.out.println("Time Required for Clone: "+ (System.currentTimeMillis()-before));

  //peformance
  long beforeCopy = System.currentTimeMillis();
  for(int i=0;i<Integer.MAX_VALUE;i++)
  {
      Arrays.copyOf(str, str.length);
  }
  System.out.println("Time Required for Copy of: "+ (System.currentTimeMillis()-beforeCopy));

}

And it outputs

[a, b, c]
[a, b, d]
[a, b, c]
[a, b, d]
Time Required for Clone: 26288
Time Required for Copy of: 25413

So if you see in both case String[] is immutable and performance is almost same thought Arrays.copyOf() is slightly faster on my machine.

Update

I changed program to create large array[100 strings] rather than small array.

  String[] str =  new String[100];

  for(int i= 0; i<str.length;i++)
  {
      str[i]= Integer.toString(i);
  }

And moved copy of method before clone method. With below results.

 Time Required for Copy of: 415095
 Time Required for Clone: 428501

Which are again more of same. Please do not ask me to run the test again as it takes a while :(

Update 2

For String array 1000000 and for number of iterations 10000

Time Required for Copy of: 32825
Time Required for Clone: 30138

copy of takes more time than clone

share|improve this answer
    
How many times have you run the test? –  assylias Aug 28 '12 at 10:44
    
@assylias for Integer.MAX_VALUE ie 0x7fffffff –  AmitD Aug 28 '12 at 10:45
    
I mean how many times have you run the whole benchmark? Results could vary from one run to another - Have you also made sure GC is not interering with your results? –  assylias Aug 28 '12 at 10:46
    
@assylias 2 times and yes they vary but if we take an average then it is almost same for both cases. –  AmitD Aug 28 '12 at 10:48
    
This copies a very small array many times. It is far better to test copying of large arrays in order to stress the copying itself and not any logic surrounding it. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '12 at 10:57

In terms of mutability, they will provide exactly the same - shallow copy of data.

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OK. Any of them faster ? –  BGR Aug 28 '12 at 10:27
3  
Shallow copy of immutable objects is a perfectly valid approach. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '12 at 10:29
1  
@BGR copyOf uses System.arraycopy, I guess that clone uses it as well. So they should have equal performance (still, copyOf has some additional checks for types, so it might be slightly slower) –  jdevelop Aug 28 '12 at 10:33
    
copyOf needs type checking only if you specify the resulting array type. Similar for System.arraycopy. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 28 '12 at 10:55

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