Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this is because the return type of the template function is same as that of the first argument (T).
How can I modify this template so that, it behaves correctly in all cases?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
template <typename T, typename U>
T max(T x, U y)
{
    return x>y ? x : y;
}

int main()
{
    cout<<max(17.9,17)<<"\n";
    cout<<max(17,17.9)<<"\n";
}

Output:

17.9  
17
share|improve this question
    
It is misbehaving, because it's doing implicit cast to either double or int. You could write specialized versions for the standard types. –  Bartek Banachewicz Aug 28 '12 at 11:47
    
what's wrong with std::max? –  Moritz Aug 28 '12 at 11:56
1  
@Moritz, The question is not about how to find the maximum of 2 numbers. –  cppcoder Aug 28 '12 at 12:01
    
@cppcoder: I got that. However, if you change to template<typename T> as David suggested, you have the exact same behavior as std::max, and even if not its very very similar, so I was just curious why you wanted/needed to implement your own - isn't that what comments are for? It was an honest question, sorry if it came off the wrong way –  Moritz Aug 28 '12 at 12:15
3  
You should be weary of using namespace std. There is an std::max, you have your own max, it is asking for trouble... –  juanchopanza Aug 28 '12 at 12:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The output is correct. You never specified a type, so complaining that it didn't use the type you wanted it to use is not reasonable. If you want a specific type, you have to ensure both parameters are that type.

You could cast the first parameter to a double. Or you could specifically invoke
max<double, double>. You could also specialize max<int, double> and similar combinations if you really, really wanted to.

share|improve this answer
    
Scwartz, Does that mean, in this case, only template <typename T> is useful? All other combinations needs to be specialized. –  cppcoder Aug 28 '12 at 12:04
    
@cppcoder not necessarily. You just need to decide what you want to return for two different input types. Then you can implement that using auto plus trailing return type, or std::result_of. –  juanchopanza Aug 28 '12 at 12:13
    
I used this option : cout<<max<double>(17,17.9)<<"\n"; –  cppcoder Aug 28 '12 at 12:18

The behaviour for your implementation is correct, though you may not want that output. The problem with the return type in your code.

You may want to use trailing-return type if you can use C++11:

template <typename T, typename U>
auto max(T x, U y) -> decltype(x>y ? x : y)    //C++11 only
{
    return x>y ? x : y;
}

which would give this output:

17.9
17.9

I hope that is the desired output.

Online demo : http://ideone.com/2Sh5Y

share|improve this answer

with c++11 its easy, use std::common_type<> trait:

template <typename T, typename U>
typename std::common_type<T,U>::type max(T x, U y) /// why not const& T and const& U ?
{
    return x>y ? x : y;
}

common_type<> uses decltype keyword and declval<> trait which are both new since c++11

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Re. the comment: for primitive types you don't want to pass references, as the cost might actually be larger than copying the values. That being said, there is nothing that blocks users from passing more complex types like std::string –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 28 '12 at 12:45
    
declval is not a keyword. It is function template. decltype is a keyword in C++11. –  Nawaz Aug 28 '12 at 13:06
    
@Nawaz fixed it –  brightstar Aug 28 '12 at 13:12

This is answer for C++03. For C++11 - use auto/decltype (see other answers).

You have to create another template: template CommonNumericType<T1,T2>:

template <typename L, typename R>
typename CommonNumericType<T1,T2>::Type max(L x, R y)
{
    return x>y ? x : y;
}

And specialize this CommonNumericType for every possible pair of numeric types:

template <typename L, typename R>
struct CommonNumericType;
template <typename T>
struct CommonNumericType<T,T> {
   typedef T Type;
};
template <typename L>
struct CommonNumericType<L,long double> {
   typedef long double Type;
};
template <typename R>
struct CommonNumericType<long double,R> {
   typedef long double Type;
};
// ...
template <>
struct CommonNumericType<int,short> {
   typedef int Type;
};
// and many others stuff

I can think of making some numeric types hierarchy - float types before int types - and so on. Because <number of numeric types>^2 is quite big number:

template <typename T>
struct NumericTypeOrder;
template <>
struct NumericTypeOrder<long double> { enum { VALUE = 1 }; };
template <>
struct NumericTypeOrder<double> { enum { VALUE = 2 }; };
template <>
struct NumericTypeOrder<float> { enum { VALUE = 3 }; };
template <>
struct NumericTypeOrder<unsigned long long> { enum { VALUE = 4 }; };
// etc for all numeric types - where signed char is last one...

template <typename L, typename R, bool L_bigger_than_R>
struct CommonNumericTypeImpl;
template <typename L, typename R>
struct CommonNumericTypeImpl<L,R,true> {
  typedef L type;
};
template <typename L, typename R>
struct CommonNumericTypeImpl<L,R,false> {
  typedef R type;
};
template <typename L, typename R>
struct CommonNumericType 
: CommonNumericTypeImpl<L,R,NumericTypeOrder<L>::value >= NumericTypeOrder<R>::value > {
};

Or just use macro:

#define max(l,r) ((l) >= (r) ? (l) : (r))

Much simpler, isn't it?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the C++03 effort. Regarding the macro, it has all the problems of macros, and in particular the fact that it evaluates one of the arguments twice. Consider max( f(), g() ): that will evaluate f, then g and then the one that produced the maximum again. Besides the cost of the operation, the fact that the functions are multiply evaluated will break if they have side effects. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 28 '12 at 12:48
    
My gut feeling says that typelist can help implementing CommonNumericType more elegantly. –  Nawaz Aug 28 '12 at 13:04
    
@David - you are right about macro. But with macro you can assign value to bigger variable: max(a,b) = 7 where a,b are variables. I remember some article about how to achieve max(...) assignable with templates - but I cannot find it now. –  PiotrNycz Aug 28 '12 at 13:17
    
@PiotrNycz: I know the article, it was by Alexandrescu, if that helps narrow the search. I believe it was published in DrDobbs. At any rate it was a horrible beast of 174 lines of code... I think this is it: drdobbs.com/generic-min-and-max-redivivus/184403774 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 28 '12 at 13:42
    
@Navaz - I believe I saw somewhere implementation with typelist. Anyway I provided the other solutions - simpler than my previous one - but I am not sure if it is simpler than with typelist... –  PiotrNycz Aug 28 '12 at 13:50

In C++11 you can use type inference (with auto, late return types and decltype):

template <typename T, typename U>
auto max(T x, U y) -> decltype(x>y ? x : y)
{
  return x>y ? x : y;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.