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I am writing a simple profanity filter in PHP. Can anyone tell my why, in the following code, the filter works (it will print [explicit]) for the $vowels array and not the $lines array which I constructing from a text file?

 function clean($str){

$handle = fopen("badwords.txt", "r");
if ($handle) {
   while (!feof($handle)) {
       $array[] = fgets($handle, 4096);
   }
   fclose($handle);
}

$vowels = array("a", "e", "i", "o", "u", "A", "E", "I", "O", "U");

$filter = "[explicit]";
$clean = str_replace($array, $filter, $str);
return $clean;
 }

When using $vowels in replace of $array, it works except for lowercase vowels which return:

 [[expl[explicit]c[explicit]t]xpl[explicit]c[explicit]t]

 instead of 

 [explicit]

Not sure why that is going on, either.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

Make sure you read:

Coding Horror: Obscenity Filters: Bad Idea, or Incredibly Intercoursing Bad Idea?

before you choose to continue on the road of string replacement...

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1  
Skimmed through it, too tired to read all of it right now. Looks very interesting though, thanks! –  littleK Aug 1 '09 at 7:04
    
It basically states that you cannot succeed in filtering human language without interpreting it. Google for 'clbuttic'. –  Jacco Aug 1 '09 at 16:32

Because the output of the filter contains lower case vowels, which are also the characters you're filtering. Namely you're creating a feedback loop.

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Good point! Thanks –  littleK Aug 1 '09 at 7:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I modified Davethegr8's solution to get the following working example:

 function clean($str){

global $clean_words; 

$replacement = '[explicit]';

if(empty($clean_words)){
	$badwords = explode("\n", file_get_contents('badwords.txt'));

	$clean_words = array();

	foreach($badwords as $word) {
    	$clean_words[]= '/(\b' . trim($word) . '\b)/si';
	}
}

$out = preg_replace($clean_words, $replacement, $str);
return $out;
 }
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First off, file_get_contents is a much simpler function to read a file into a variable.

$badwords = explode("\n", file_get_contents('badwords.txt');

Second, preg_replace offers much more flexible string replacement options. - http://us3.php.net/preg_replace

foreach($badwords as $word) {
    $patterns[] = '/'.$word.'/';
}

$replacement = '[explicit]';

$output = preg_replace($patterns, $replacement, $input);
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1  
That's a pretty poor code example You've provided as only the last word in the badwords.txt will be replaced with the text '[explicit]'. If anything you should simply remove the foreach and do the following: $output = preg_replace($badwords, $replacement, $input); –  Andy Aug 1 '09 at 6:47
1  
@andy - haha, oops. It was late last night and I forgot a []. :) –  davethegr8 Aug 1 '09 at 15:45

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