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Is it at all possible to create a member which would effectively be inaccessible by the class that declares it? Only derived classes would be able to access the member.

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Why in the world would you want to do that? –  Idan Arye Aug 28 '12 at 12:53
    
Maybe you could declare a property at an interface, and implement it on your classes. –  Andre Calil Aug 28 '12 at 12:53
    
The main reason is for maintainability (if someone were to look at the code and find the method useful inside the declaring class, they would see that it is inaccessible in that class and have to ask why, for example). It would avoid having to use null reference checks in some cases as well. –  Marc K Aug 28 '12 at 13:27
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The closest you'd be looking for is protected, which can only be accessed by the class that declares it and its derivatives. See here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173121.aspx

Unless you are referring to an abstract class, which can't be instantiated and can contain method declarations without code: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sf985hc5(v=vs.71).aspx

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No, that can't be done. The least access modifier is private which is accessible inside the class but not outside

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No. In C# there's no way to do it.

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If you really want to do that you can create a property with the set that does not allow any change - so not really inaccessible, but restricting functionality. However, this could point to design that needs revisting to decide if there is a better approach.

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