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I was going through the previous discussion in which there was a detailed discussion on the difference between a service locator and a dependency injector, but still I am not able to get that. Can I get a general response without any code?

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Relatied: stackoverflow.com/questions/4985455/… –  Steven Aug 28 '12 at 13:20
    
Did you try googling? –  Steven Aug 28 '12 at 13:20
    
I have been doing the same but it adds more to my confusion. –  user1469030 Aug 28 '12 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code sample applies the Dependency Injection principle:

public class UserService : IUserService
{
    private IUserRepository repository;

    // Constructor taking dependencies
    public UserService(IUserRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }
}

This code sample uses the Service Locator pattern:

public class UserService : IUserService
{
    private IUserRepository repository;

    public UserService()
    {
        this.repository =
            ObjectFactory.GetInstance<IUserRepository>();
    }
}

And even this is an implementation of the Service Locator pattern:

public class UserService : IUserService
{
    private IUserRepository repository;

    public UserService(Container container)
    {
        this.repository =
            container.GetInstance<IUserRepository>();
    }
}

The difference is that with Dependency Injection, you inject all dependencies a consumer needs, into the consumer (but nothing else). The ideal way of injecting it is through the constructor.

With Service Locator you request the dependencies from some shared source. In the first example this was the static ObjectFactory class, while in the second example this was the Container instance that was injected into the constructor. The last code snippet is still an implementation of the Service Locator pattern, although the container itself is injected using dependency injection.

There are important reasons why you should use Dependency Injection over Service Locator. This article does a good job explaining it.

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Steven thank you so much, I had my doubt cleared. –  user1469030 Aug 29 '12 at 3:59

If you use a service locator, it usually means that you explicitly ask some object to create another object for you, which is usually considered an anti-pattern. Dependency injection is the other way around.

Say you have a class called Warrior, which has a Weapon. Using the service locator, you would ask the service locator for a Weapon in the constructor of the Warrior.
Using dependency injection, the Weapon would be injected into the constructor of the Warrior, without you explicitly asking for it.

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Thank you it really explains, and now I can get all those examples very well. –  user1469030 Aug 29 '12 at 3:57
    
Can you help me in explaining the same through that msdn example msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd458879.aspx –  user1469030 Aug 29 '12 at 4:15
    
If class A depends on ServiceA and ServiceB, I would create a constructor for class A as such: A(ServiceA serviceA, ServiceB serviceB); that's dependency injection (more specifically constructor injection). Using a service locator, you could create a parameterless constructor and within that constructor, ask the service locator for an instance of ServiceA and an instance of ServiceB. –  Stefan Billiet Aug 29 '12 at 6:39
    
Okay and this explains me very well. –  user1469030 Aug 29 '12 at 10:20

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