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Every time I initiate the use of JavaScript on my site, it scroll's me to the top of the page, how do I prevent this? The webpage is connecting to an external .js file, which is often fetching information from my .php files (There is no SQL connection yet).

All of the JS functions change content on the page without the page reloading. So things like -

document.getElementById('element').innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;

It's going to be a game, and hopefully on Facebook! The automatic "Snap" back to the top of the page is very tedious and annoying. Is there a way to prevent this?

Edit: For sake of clarity as asked. (Thank you very much for the responses btw!)

<a href="#" onclick="showData(1);"><img src="./images/qstata.png" /></a> 

function showData(str)
{
if (str=="")
  {
  document.getElementById("currentactivity").innerHTML="";
  return;
  }
if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
  {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
  xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
  }
else
  {// code for IE6, IE5
  xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
  }
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
  {
  if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
    {
    document.getElementById("currentactivity").innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
    }
  }
xmlhttp.open("GET","index.php?q="+str,true);
xmlhttp.send();
}

This is one of the examples of code I am using, I am still learning, so I'm using a lot of different styles as I code. Below is one more example.

function missionPop()
{
  var iframe= document.getElementById('missioniframe')
  iframe.style.visibility='visible';
}

As I wait for a response, I am going to go try out your suggestion pebbl!

share|improve this question
    
Can you post the full function that causes the page to jump? –  woz Aug 28 '12 at 13:17
2  
Is content being replaced? If the element's contents are removed temporarily, the browser may compensate by scrolling to the top of that element. –  Nick Brunt Aug 28 '12 at 13:17
    
@Hanzo Hasashi - would you be able to mark this question as answered, as it sounds like it is? Being quite new to stackoverflow myself (only a couple of months now) it took me a while to find the tick to accept an answer :) -- welcome to stackoverflow btw. –  Pebbl Aug 30 '12 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

As I said in my comment above, if the contents of the element are replaced, the browser will compensate by scrolling to the top of that element.

You could get around this by assigning the element a fixed height, thereby preventing it from resizing when content is changed. Or possibly by appending your new information to the element, instead of replacing it (if that doesn't defeat the point of the update).

Edit:

Add return false; to the end of your function. This will negate the effect of the hash link. Read pebbl's answer for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
I have assigned a fixed width and height and am still having the same issue. But I will remember this for the future incase I encounter the same problem!! –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:33
    
Which browser are you using? Are you firing this JavaScript with an onclick event from a link with a hash as suggested by pebbl? –  Nick Brunt Aug 28 '12 at 13:34
    
Yes I am, he hit the nail on the head with the hash link and the onclick. I am using Chrome and IE9 currently. –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:37
    
The return false; did not solve the issue. So I have both that and the fixed height and width, but am still experiencing the problem it seems. –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:42
    
Have you tried removing the hash altogether? Just use <a href="" onclick="...">, or assign the onclick event to the image and do away with the link. –  Nick Brunt Aug 28 '12 at 13:46

Jumping hashtags

By the sounds of it you are adding JavaScript events to links that have #hashtag in their href:

<a href="#hashtag">Click Me</a>

Calling an undefined #hastag will jump the scroll back to the top of the page. Whatever you are using to applying your event listener functions you must cancel the click event to stop the jump.

Problem

The following code will trigger the problem you are having:

<a href="#" id="click_link">Click me</a>

<script type="text/javascript">

  function click_me(){
    document.getElementByTagName('body')[0].style.background = '#F00';
  }

  window.onload = function(){
    document.getElementById('click_link').onclick = click_me;
  }

</script>


Solution

All you have to do is add the following to prevent the click from continuing on the link, which will stop the #hashtag from being triggered, which in turn will stop the page jumping:

<a href="#" id="click_link">Click me</a>

<script type="text/javascript">

  function click_me(){
    document.getElementByTagName('body')[0].style.background = '#F00';
    return false; /// return false tells the event to cancel
  }

  window.onload = function(){
    document.getElementById('click_link').onclick = click_me;
  }

</script>

But it all depends on exactly what you are using to define your event handlers.


Cancelling events

...with inline handlers

Inline handlers should be treated as if the onclick attribute will be rendered as the body part of a function. i.e. click_me();return false; would actually translate to being function(){click_me();return false;} when it is evaluated. This is why things like onclick="click_me" don't work as all you are doing is accessible a variable, rather than triggering a function.

<a href="#" onclick="click_me();return false;">Click Me</a>
<a href="#" onclick="return click_me();">Click Me</a>


...with js property handlers

With property handlers you are supplying the whole of the function, rather than just the body, the principal is still the same however. return false; is all you need.

<a href="#" id="my_link">Click Me</a>

<script type="text/javascript">
  window.onload = function(){
    document.getElementById('my_link').onclick = function(){
       return false;
    };
  }
</script>


...with js event collections

Event collections are by far the best way to set up and manage events in JavaScript. The main reasons for this are that you can easily apply multiple event handlers to the same element (without knowing what other handlers already exist), and you keep you code seperate from your markup. The principal in stopping the event from continuing is again similar, return false; will have the same effect.

<a href="#" id="my_link">Click Me</a>

<script type="text/javascript">

  function click_me(){
    return false;
  }

  window.onload = function(){
    var elm = document.getElementById('my_link');
    if ( elm.attachEvent ) {
      elm.attachEvent('onclick', click_me);
    }
    else if( elm.addEventListener ) {
      elm.addEventListener('click', click_me);
    }
  }

</script>
share|improve this answer
    
TIL what an event handler is. Thank you. –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:39
    
Btw. The return false; did not solve the issue! –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:42
    
Figured it out guys! Thank's to a combination of pebbl's "return false;" and the below websites instructions for using onclick="return showData(1);" instead of just onclick="showData(1);" was able to avoid the browser scrolling to the top. Thank you very much for your help everyone. =] <3 –  Hanzo Hasashi Aug 28 '12 at 13:48
    
Ah good news. Apologies... I sometimes forget that jargon should be avoided at all costs :) an event handler is a function you apply to 'handle an event'... so basically you would call your showData function an event handler. Just for future reference I'll extend my answer to explain different ways of applying handlers and cancelling events. –  Pebbl Aug 28 '12 at 13:56

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