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I'm building a web application that uses the computer's webcam via webRTC. The site is only running on one specific machine which will shut down and reboot once a day.

My problem is: how do I get the machine to automatically confirm the webcam dialogue once the site has loaded?

The system is OSX Leopard with the latest Chrome. Thanks already, I'm open for anything.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Based on what the Chromium developers are saying, there is currently no option to configure your browser to allow camera usage, unless you utilize the "Always allow" dialog - which will only be shown if the site is served using HTTPS. That means, if you serve the HTML page using HTTPS, and once confirm the "Always allow" option, it should work from there on. Here is a collection of links where you'll find answers to the same or similar questions:

  1. Chromium issue 143372: allow "always allow" for http://localhost
  2. WebRTC: allow Chrome to access microphone via Chrome Extension
  3. http://www.chromium.org/developers/web-platform-status (see section on WebRTC): "For the permission dialog: Chrome only show the "Always allow" for sites using https for increased security."
  4. Discuss WebRTC Google Group: Automatically allow Camera Access Request in webrtc enabled Chrome
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Firefox : (You have to tell users like..)

  • Go in url about:config

  • Search media.navigator.permission.disabled

  • dbClick or set Value to true

Tested version : 23.0 +


Chrome : http://stackoverflow.com/a/16929608/622813 or use HTTPS

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After half an hour of troubleshooting, it was a lot easier for me to just switch to firefox for this project and use the above. I couldn't ever convince chrome to allow localhost –  Andrew Plummer Aug 15 '13 at 13:18

There is a chrome option for that : --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream. This works in both http and https.

  • On Windows : start chrome --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream

  • On GNU/Linux* : google-chrome --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream

  • On Mac: Applications/Google\ Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google\ Chrome --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream

This could be useful in a development/testing environment.

*Maybe this is just a matter of time, but it didn't work on my chromium on Ubuntu. I had to get the .deb from the google chrome website.

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Mac: /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google\ Chrome --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream –  Peter Ehrlich Jul 19 at 17:58
    
Thanks for the complement @PeterEhrlich. Should you want to, you can edit my answer also :) –  nha Jul 19 at 18:14
    
You can put this command in a shortcut of chrome. For example for my development is use the desktop shortcut like this: "%localappdata%\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe " --user-data-dir=$(mktemp -d) --kiosk "http://localhost:52902/Default.aspx" --use-fake-ui-for-media-stream –  prespic Aug 17 at 13:08

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