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I have the following class:

class A
{
    private:
        int starter()
        {
             //TO_DO: pthread_create()
        }

        void* threadStartRoutine( void *pThis );
}

I want to create a thread from inside starter() to run threadStartRoutine(). I get compile time errors with regard to the third argument, which should take the address of the start routine.

What would be the correct way to call pthread_create() to create a new thread that starts executing threadStartRoutine() ?

I have come across articles online that say that most compilers do not allow non-static member functions to be invoked using pthread_create(). Is this true? What is the reason behind this?

I am compiling my program on Linux-x64 using G++.

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make thread start routine static –  neagoegab Aug 28 '12 at 13:22
    
@neagoegab: I cannot make threadStartRoutine static. The class is multi-threaded. Making threadStartRoutine static results in memory leak errors that I'm trying to get rid of. –  Shailesh Tainwala Aug 28 '12 at 13:25
    
possible duplicate of The fouth parameter in pthread_create function –  Sergey K. Aug 28 '12 at 13:30
    
    
Unless you're stuck in the past for some reason, you should consider the standard thread library. And even if you are stuck in the past, Boost.Thread might be a better option than rolling your own wrapper around pthreads. –  Mike Seymour Aug 28 '12 at 13:39
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declare the threadStartRountine() as static:

static void* threadStartRoutine( void *pThis );

Otherwise, the type of threadStartRoutine() is:

void* (A::*)(void*)

which is not the type of function pointer that pthread_create() requires.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot. The class is multi-threaded. Making threadStartRoutine static results in memory leak errors that I'm trying to get rid of. –  Shailesh Tainwala Aug 28 '12 at 13:24
    
@ShaileshTainwala, I am unsure how either of those two arguments prevent you from making the function static? –  hmjd Aug 28 '12 at 13:26
2  
The sentence "The class is multi-threaded" makes absolutely no sense. That's not how C++ and programming work. –  Kerrek SB Aug 28 '12 at 13:26
2  
@ShaileshTainwala: Do not make the function static. Instead write a new static function that calls yours, and use this new function as argument to pthread_create(). And everybody happy! Naturally you will need to pass on the this argument so that the static function can call a non-static one. But that's why you have the pThis argument. –  rodrigo Aug 28 '12 at 13:33
2  
@ShaileshTainwala - they're functions, ie. code, with stack parameters, ie. different for each thread. There is no problem calling a static function from multiple threads, passing a 'this' pointer and then calling a method on 'this'. Problems arise when involving static data mambers that are shared by all callers. –  Martin James Aug 28 '12 at 13:34
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Do you have a reason for using pthreads? c++11 is here, why not just use that:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

void doWork()
{
   while(true) 
   {
      // Do some work;
      sleep(1); // Rest
      std::cout << "hi from worker." << std::endl;
   }
}

int main(int, char**)
{

  std::thread worker(&doWork);
  std::cout << "hello from main thread, the worker thread is busy." << std::endl;
  worker.join();

  return 0;
}
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Just use a normal function as a wrapper. As hjmd says, a static function is probably the nicest kind of normal function.

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If you insist on using the native pthreads interface, then you must provide an ordinary function as the entry point. A typical example:

class A
{
private:
    int starter()
    {
        pthread_t thr;
        int res = pthread_create(&thr, NULL, a_starter, this);
        // ...
    }
public:
    void run();
};

extern "C" void * a_starter(void * p)
{
    A * a = reinterpret_cast<A*>(p);
    a->run();
    return NULL;
}
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