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I have a piece of code where in I have an if block which when satisfied the flow goes into it and in there are nested if and else, if it does not satisfies any of the if block it should go into the else block but the problem i am facing is that it satisfies one if block and then goes into else as well. this is creating redundancy in my code. it like this

 if(condition = true)
 {
    if(condition1 == true)
       {}
    if(condition2 == true)
       {}
    else
       {}
 }

Now it satisfies condition 1 and then after performing if block operations goes into else also. Please help. Code is in C#

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All the 3 answers in short ask you to use if-else block. +1 for all. –  Ganesh R. Aug 1 '09 at 7:24
1  
@as: there's a typo in the first line. Change 'condition = true' to 'condition == true'. –  Stephen C Aug 1 '09 at 7:54
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

get rid of the ==true's its just going to lead to a mistake like you made on the first line. also, add in else statements.

if (condition) 
{
   if (condition1)  
      { } 
   else if (condition2) 
      { }    
   else 
      { }
}
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its if(condition == true) –  chh Aug 1 '09 at 7:20
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You probably need something like this (notice else if with condition2):

if(condition)
{
    if(condition1)
       {}
    else if(condition2)
       {}
    else
       {}
}

You can skip '== true' in conditions.

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No, it is not what the TS wants... When 'condition' does not evaluate to true, then condition1 is satisfied according to the TS ... –  Frederik Gheysels Aug 1 '09 at 7:23
5  
I believe this is exactly what the OP wants. If condition1 is true, it's currently going into the "else" block and he doesn't want it to. –  Jon Skeet Aug 1 '09 at 7:23
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As RaYell says, you need an extra "if" block. Here's a short but complete example to demonstrate:

using System;

public class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        bool condition = true;
        bool condition1 = true;
        bool condition2 = false;

        if (condition)
        {
            if (condition1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("condition1");
            }
            // Note the "else if" here.
            else if (condition2) {
                Console.WriteLine("condition2");
            }
            else 
            {
                Console.WriteLine("neither");
            }
        }
    }
}

This prints "condition1" but not "neither".

If that isn't what you want, please clarify your question.

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Put it like this

if(condition == true) {
  if(condition1 == true) {}
  else if(condition2 == true) {}
  else {}
}
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Ya you can use else if.Also you can write if (condition==true) as if(condition) simply

For example

    int i=2;
    int j=3;
    int k=4;
    bool condition=k>1;
    bool condition1=j<i;
    bool condition2=j>i;

    if (condition)
    {
        if (condition1)
        { }
        else if (condition2)
        { }
        else
        { }
    }
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Then, why don't you split up your code in methods, so you can do this:

if( condition)
{
    if( condition1 )
    {
         DoSomethingForSituation1();
    }
    else
    {
         DoSomethingForSituation2();
    }
}
else
{
    DoSomethingForSituation1();
}

Also, when I look at it this way, you could say that 'condition' is redundant ? Because either way, condition1 will always be true in some scenario ?

if( condition1 )
{
    DoSomethingForSituation1();
}
else if( condition2 )
{
    DoSomethingForSituation2();
}
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condition2 disappeared from your first example. I'm not exactly sure how he wants it to work either, but I don't think that is what he meant. –  Thorarin Aug 1 '09 at 7:40
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