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I have 2 branches, master and newfeature. When I want to merge newfeature into master, I used:

git checkout master
git merge newfeature

I get the error:

Auto-merging .gitignore
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in .gitignore
Automatic merge failed; fix conflicts and then commit the result.

I opened up .gitignore and it looks like a mess now with the last part of the file looking like

<<<<<<< HEAD
public/img/ignore
=======
public/img/profiles
public/blog
public/recommendation
>>>>>>> newfeature

What happened, and how should this be fixed so that I can merge the branch into master?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You edited the .gitignore in both branches. Now, git is unsure of which lines in each copy are the correct ones so it is asking you to resolve them.

The lines:

<<<<<<< HEAD
public/img/ignore
=======

Are what appears in the copy of the file in master.

And

=======
public/img/profiles
public/blog
public/recommendation
>>>>>>> newfeature

in the branch newfeature

You should just have to edit the file as you would like it to appear finally. Then...

git add .gitignore
git commit
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Simply edit .gitignore file to resolve conflict:

Before

<<<<<<< HEAD
public/img/ignore
=======
public/img/profiles
public/blog
public/recommendation
>>>>>>> newfeature

After

public/img/ignore
public/img/profiles
public/blog
public/recommendation

Then:

git add .gitignore

git commit

Autogenerated commit message should apear, accept it (save & close) and it's done.

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Git's automatic merge failed. This usually happens when changes occur to the same file at the same time in different branches/repositories when trying to merge branches/push content.

The modifications made to .gitignore on the branch newfeature conflits with the one made on master. The line: <<<<<<< HEAD indicates the modifications made on master, which follow this line, while the line >>>>>>> newfeature indicates the modifications made on newfeature, which precede this line. The two modifications are separated by =======.

You should edit manually the file and keep/merge what is useful in each of the two parts. Then you should commit (after removing the <<<<HEAD , ===== and >>>newfeature lines).

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What happened is that there was a merge conflict: two branches changed the file "at the same time", in distinct streams. You can see the changes other branch has done in "newfeature" section and the other in the HEAD section.

What you need to do is to edit that file so that it will contain the contents that you want, add that to be followed and then commit that. This is known as a merge commit.

Now, what I told above is doing a merge by hand, "manually". It is possibly the easiest to understand. You can also use git mergetool command to do that with a visual tool, if configured, or use "git merge" with some strategy that will tell it how to handle the conflict.

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You should merge your .gitignore by hand, then add it to index by

$ git add .gitignore

You can get the basics of merging here: http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Basic-Branching-and-Merging

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Fix the conflicts in the .gitignore file, add the updated version and then commit:

vim .gitignore
# assuming you want all 4 lines: simply remove the conflict markers (<<<<<<, ======, and >>>>>)
git add .gitignore
git commit
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Use git mergetool to resolve the conflict (or just fix it yourself manually; this isn't a particularly hard case to resolve), then re-commit.

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