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Consider this code:

#include <iostream>


void f(int&& i)
{
    std::cout << "f(int&&)\n";
}

void f(const int&& i)
{
    std::cout << "f(const int&&)\n";
}


int fun_i()
{
    return 0;
}

const int fun_ci()
{
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    f(fun_i());
    f(fun_ci());
}

If I compile this with MSVC 2012, the output is:

f(int&&)
f(const int&&)

If I compile with GCC 4.7, the output is:

f(int&&)
f(int&&)

Which is correct?

(If I remove the second definition of f, the program will not compile under MSVC 2012, but it does compile under GCC 4.7.)

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Note: There's almost no point in taking a const&& as a parameter. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 28 '12 at 23:08
    
But in the book C++ Primer Plus(by Stephen Prata) in Appendix F(The string Template Class), one of the constructors of basic_string is basic_string(basic_string&& str) noexcept; !! Why is it included anyway? –  bmm May 3 '13 at 14:11
    
The basic_string(basic_string&& str) constructor is a so-called move constructor, something introduced in C++11. It may be marginally faster than the old copy constructor, basic_string(const basic_string& str). –  oz1cz May 4 '13 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

GCC is correct. From paragraph 4 of 3.10 Lvalues and rvalues [basic.lval]:

Class prvalues can have cv-qualified types; non-class prvalues always have cv-unqualified types. [...]

A function call such as fun_ci() is in fact a prvalue*, and as such has type int, not const int. int&& is a better match than const int&&, and should be picked by overload resolution.

*: it's customarily said that top-level cv-qualifiers are ignored for non-class return types.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Luc! I verified what you wrote by replacing 'int' with a class in the code, and then both compilers provide the same output: First without 'const', then with 'const'. –  oz1cz Aug 28 '12 at 14:09
    
@ClausTøndering You could also try with an xvalue, e.g. you pass in std::move(i) for a non-const variable and a const variable. –  Luc Danton Aug 28 '12 at 14:12

I'm inclined to say that gcc appears to be doing the right thing, based on a warning it emits:

stieber@gatekeeper:~$ g++ -std=c++11 -Wignored-qualifiers Test.cpp
Test.cpp:20:18: warning: type qualifiers ignored on function return type [-Wignored-qualifiers]
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