Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to create a div, that is situated beneath a block of content but that once the page has been scrolled enough to contact its top boundary, becomes fixed in place and scrolls with the page. I know I've seen at least one example of this online but I cannot remember it for the life of me.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
As of June 2014, the Sticky-kit jQuery plugin is one of the easiest options, providing an extremely low barrier to entry and lots of features. Great place to start if you're looking for an easy way to get off the ground quickly. –  user456584 Jun 21 at 0:46
add comment

16 Answers 16

up vote 92 down vote accepted

You could use simply css, positioning your element as fixed:

.fixedElement {
    background-color: #c0c0c0;
    position:fixed;
    top:0;
    width:100%;
    z-index:100;
}

Edit: You should have the element with position absolute, once the scroll offset has reached the element, it should be changed to fixed, and the top position should be set to zero.

You can detect the top scroll offset of the document with the scrollTop function:

$(window).scroll(function(e){ 
  $el = $('.fixedElement'); 
  if ($(this).scrollTop() > 200 && $el.css('position') != 'fixed'){ 
    $('.fixedElement').css({'position': 'fixed', 'top': '0px'}); 
  }
  if ($(this).scrollTop() < 200 && $el.css('position') == 'fixed')
  {
    $('.fixedElement').css({'position': 'static', 'top': '0px'}); 
  } 
});

When the scroll offset reached 200, the element will stick to the top of the browser window, because is placed as fixed.

Check this new example.

share|improve this answer
1  
that doesn't acchieve what I'm going for. I'd like the element to start at 200px below the top of the page (to allow room for other content) and then once the user has scrolled down become fixed at the top. –  evanr Aug 1 '09 at 8:10
3  
your edit does indeed fill the needs of the question now but you still have a problem when the page scrolls back to the top again. you could after reaching the element scrollTop store it somewhere, and when the page hits that position again (when scrolling upwards) change the css back to default... probably better to do this with a .toggleClass then... –  Sander Aug 2 '09 at 0:35
6  
This is pretty much what when with but I did have to remove the fixed positioning when the is window is scrolled back to the top. if ($(this).scrollTop() < 200 && $el.css('position') == 'fixed') { $('.fixedElement').css({'position': 'static', 'top': '0px'}); } –  Derrick Petzold Mar 8 '12 at 20:46
    
@DerrickPetzold I put that into the answer, pretty important stuff :) –  MDeSchaepmeester May 23 at 9:58
add comment

You've seen this example on Google Code's issue page and (only recently) on Stack Overflow's edit page.

CMS's answer doesn't revert the positioning when you scroll back up. Here's the shamelessly stolen code from Stack Overflow:

function moveScroller() {
    var move = function() {
        var st = $(window).scrollTop();
        var ot = $("#scroller-anchor").offset().top;
        var s = $("#scroller");
        if(st > ot) {
            s.css({
                position: "fixed",
                top: "0px"
            });
        } else {
            if(st <= ot) {
                s.css({
                    position: "relative",
                    top: ""
                });
            }
        }
    };
    $(window).scroll(move);
    move();
}
<div id="sidebar" style="width:270px;"> 
  <div id="scroller-anchor"></div> 
  <div id="scroller" style="margin-top:10px; width:270px"> 
    Scroller Scroller Scroller
  </div>
</div>

<script type="text/javascript"> 
  $(function() {
    moveScroller();
  });
</script> 

And a simple live demo.

A nascent, script-free alternative is position: sticky, which is supported in Chrome Canary and WebKit nightly. See the article on HTML5Rocks and this demo.

share|improve this answer
3  
For some reason, the {scroll:false} was giving me issues (jQuery 1.6.2). Seems work without it. Fork from linked demo. Any idea if it serves a purpose? –  Eddie Sep 7 '11 at 15:23
    
I'm having alot of trouble with this, for the life of me I cannot replicate, i've even tried to replicate the live demo and its not working. can anyone link to a tutorial that provides step by step instructions? –  Trevor Dupp Sep 21 '11 at 15:27
2  
This seems to work just fine, when I use the same version of jQuery as the demo (1.3.2). At some point offset must have stopped accepting an object as input api.jquery.com/offset. @Eddie Your modification should be safe with current jQuery. –  Graeme Dec 13 '11 at 21:02
    
Is there any reason you couldn't replace var d = $("#scroller-anchor").offset().top; with var d = $("#sidebar").offset().top; and get rid of the empty scroller-anchor div all together? Here's my fork demonstrating what I'm talking about. –  Mike Deck Jan 27 '12 at 6:21
    
@MikeDeck I suspect that if there are margins or padding, you would like to be able to control where the scroller is positioned relative to the container. –  Josh Lee Jan 27 '12 at 14:03
show 3 more comments

I had the same problem as you and ended up making a jQuery plugin to take care of it. It actually solves all the problems people have listed here, plus it adds a couple of optional features too.

Options

stickyPanelSettings = {
    // Use this to set the top margin of the detached panel.
    topPadding: 0,

    // This class is applied when the panel detaches.
    afterDetachCSSClass: "",

    // When set to true the space where the panel was is kept open.
    savePanelSpace: false,

    // Event fires when panel is detached
    // function(detachedPanel, panelSpacer){....}
    onDetached: null,

    // Event fires when panel is reattached
    // function(detachedPanel){....}
    onReAttached: null,

    // Set this using any valid jquery selector to 
    // set the parent of the sticky panel.
    // If set to null then the window object will be used.
    parentSelector: null
};

http://code.google.com/p/sticky-panel/

demo: http://sticky-panel.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/jquery.stickyPanel/Main.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Hey! Thank you! This is a great solution, and thanks for sharing, for sure it saved me a lot of time. This should be the overall accepted solution for this question, since as far as I have read, it is the most complete solution. Basically, the others did not solve the problem with the original X-position of a block after the position: fixed style is applied. Yours solves this problem. Really, many thanks! –  Marcos Buarque Oct 27 '11 at 15:37
    
Hey Donny, also love your plugin (v1.4.1)... did come across one issue, Block elelments lost their width if none was specified. So altered it when detaching... only by setting the width so it remains the same. code// detach panel node.css({ "margin": 0, "left": nodeLeft, "top": newNodeTop, "position": "fixed", "width": node.width() });code –  Will Hancock Nov 17 '11 at 17:31
    
Looked for and tried many solutions, and this worked "right out of the box." Amazing work! Thank you! –  ajtatum Apr 2 '12 at 22:04
2  
@WillHancock I'v added iPad support, fixed the refresh bug and added onDetached & onReattached events. The new events will give you access to the panel & spacerpanel after it has detached & reattached. –  Donny V. Nov 20 '12 at 15:00
4  
Also added a parentSelector option to support scrolling divs. –  Donny V. Nov 21 '12 at 16:37
add comment

This is how i did it with jquery. This was all cobbled together from various answers on stack overflow. This solution caches the selectors for faster performance and also solves the "jumping" issue when the sticky div becomes sticky.

Check it out on jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/HQS8s/

CSS:

.stick {
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
}

JS:

$(document).ready(function() {
    // Cache selectors for faster performance.
    var $window = $(window),
        $mainMenuBar = $('#mainMenuBar'),
        $mainMenuBarAnchor = $('#mainMenuBarAnchor');

    // Run this on scroll events.
    $window.scroll(function() {
        var window_top = $window.scrollTop();
        var div_top = $mainMenuBarAnchor.offset().top;
        if (window_top > div_top) {
            // Make the div sticky.
            $mainMenuBar.addClass('stick');
            $mainMenuBarAnchor.height($mainMenuBar.height());
        }
        else {
            // Unstick the div.
            $mainMenuBar.removeClass('stick');
            $mainMenuBarAnchor.height(0);
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

And here's how without jquery

    <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">

    <html>
    <head>
    <style type='text/css'>
    #productMenuBar {
    border:1px solid #00ffff;

    text-align:center;

    z-index:9999;
    width:100%;
    max-width: 850px;
    margin: 0 auto; left:0px; right:0px;


    }
    </style>

    <script type='text/javascript'>
    var startProductBarPos=-1;
    window.onscroll=function(){
        var bar = document.getElementById('productMenuBar');
        if(startProductBarPos<0)startProductBarPos=findPosY(bar);

        if(pageYOffset>startProductBarPos){
            bar.style.position='fixed';
            bar.style.top=0;
        }else{
            bar.style.position='relative';
        }

    };


    function findPosY(obj) {
        var curtop = 0;
        if (typeof (obj.offsetParent) != 'undefined' && obj.offsetParent) {
            while (obj.offsetParent) {
                curtop += obj.offsetTop;
                obj = obj.offsetParent;
            }
            curtop += obj.offsetTop;
        }
        else if (obj.y)
            curtop += obj.y;
        return curtop;
    }
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>
    and this<br>
    is<Br>
    above<br>
    <div id="productMenuBar" class="productMenuBar">
        LOGO
    </div>
    hello
    <br><BR><br>
    <br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br>
    <br><BR><br>world
    <br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br>
    <br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br>
    <br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br>
    <br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br><br><BR><br>
    </body>
    </html>
share|improve this answer
add comment

My solution is a little verbose, but it handles variable positioning from the left edge for centered layouts.

// Ensurs that a element (usually a div) stays on the screen
//   aElementToStick   = The jQuery selector for the element to keep visible
global.makeSticky = function (aElementToStick) {
    var $elementToStick = $(aElementToStick);
    var top = $elementToStick.offset().top;
    var origPosition = $elementToStick.css('position');

    function positionFloater(a$Win) {
        // Set the original position to allow the browser to adjust the horizontal position
        $elementToStick.css('position', origPosition);

        // Test how far down the page is scrolled
        var scrollTop = a$Win.scrollTop();
        // If the page is scrolled passed the top of the element make it stick to the top of the screen
        if (top < scrollTop) {
            // Get the horizontal position
            var left = $elementToStick.offset().left;
            // Set the positioning as fixed to hold it's position
            $elementToStick.css('position', 'fixed');
            // Reuse the horizontal positioning
            $elementToStick.css('left', left);
            // Hold the element at the top of the screen
            $elementToStick.css('top', 0);
        }
    }

    // Perform initial positioning
    positionFloater($(window));

    // Reposition when the window resizes
    $(window).resize(function (e) {
        positionFloater($(this));
    });

    // Reposition when the window scrolls
    $(window).scroll(function (e) {
        positionFloater($(this));
    });
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's one more version to try for those having issues with the others. It pulls together the techniques discussed in this duplicate question, and generates the required helper DIVs dynamically so no extra HTML is required.

CSS:

.sticky { position:fixed; top:0; }

JQuery:

function make_sticky(id) {
    var e = $(id);
    var w = $(window);
    $('<div/>').insertBefore(id);
    $('<div/>').hide().css('height',e.outerHeight()).insertAfter(id);
    var n = e.next();
    var p = e.prev();
    function sticky_relocate() {
      var window_top = w.scrollTop();
      var div_top = p.offset().top;
      if (window_top > div_top) {
        e.addClass('sticky');
        n.show();
      } else {
        e.removeClass('sticky');
        n.hide();
      }
    }
    w.scroll(sticky_relocate);
    sticky_relocate();
}

To make an element sticky, do:

make_sticky('#sticky-elem-id');

When the element becomes sticky, the code manages the position of the remaining content to keep it from jumping into the gap left by the sticky element. It also returns the sticky element to its original non-sticky position when scrolling back above it.

share|improve this answer
    
Your approach is very similar to JohnB's approach. Considering your differences to that answer, I'm wondering (1) Is there an advantage to using a second "helper div" (instead of just 1 like JohnB uses), and (2) Is there an advantage to using hide() and show() instead of just setting the helper div's height (like JohnB does)? Perhaps a performance difference? So far I haven't been able to discern differences but perhaps certain scenarios would have differences (like maybe involving inline elements or something), so that's why I ask. Thanks. –  Jason May 7 at 20:51
add comment

Here is another option:

JAVASCRIPT

var initTopPosition= $('#myElementToStick').offset().top;   
$(window).scroll(function(){
    if($(window).scrollTop() > initTopPosition)
        $('#myElementToStick').css({'position':'fixed','top':'0px'});
    else
        $('#myElementToStick').css({'position':'absolute','top':initTopPosition+'px'});
});

Your #myElementToStick should start with position:absolute CSS property.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is an extended version to Josh Lee's answer. If you want the div to be on sidebar to the right, and float within a range (i.e., you need to specify top and bottom anchor positions). It also fixes a bug when you view this on mobile devices (you need to check left scroll position otherwise the div will move off screen).

function moveScroller() {
    var move = function() {
        var st = $(window).scrollTop();
        var sl = $(window).scrollLeft();
        var ot = $("#scroller-anchor-top").offset().top;
        var ol = $("#scroller-anchor-top").offset().left;
        var bt = $("#scroller-anchor-bottom").offset().top;
        var s = $("#scroller");
        if(st > ot) {
            if (st < bt - 280) //280px is the approx. height for the sticky div
            {
                s.css({
                    position: "fixed",
                    top: "0px",
                    left: ol-sl
                }); 
            }
            else
            {
                s.css({
                    position: "fixed",
                    top: bt-st-280,
                    left: ol-sl
                }); 
            }
        } else {
            s.css({
                position: "relative",
                top: "",
                left: ""
            });

        }
    };
    $(window).scroll(move);
    move();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The info provided to answer this other question may be of help to you, Evan:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/487073/jquery-check-if-element-is-visible-after-scroling

You basically want to modify the style of the element to set it to fixed only after having verified that the document.body.scrollTop value is equal to or greater than the top of your element.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The accepted answer works but doesn't move back to previous position if you scroll above it. It is always stuck to the top after being placed there.

  $(window).scroll(function(e) {
    $el = $('.fixedElement');
    if ($(this).scrollTop() > 42 && $el.css('position') != 'fixed') {
      $('.fixedElement').css( 'position': 'fixed', 'top': '0px');

    } else if ($(this).scrollTop() < 42 && $el.css('position') != 'relative') {
      $('.fixedElement').css( 'relative': 'fixed', 'top': '42px');
//this was just my previous position/formating
    }
  });

jleedev's response whould work, but I wasn't able to get it to work. His example page also didn't work (for me).

share|improve this answer
    
This is full of errors –  Jake N Mar 30 '11 at 18:23
add comment

You can add 3 extra rows so when the user scroll back to the top, the div will stick on its old place:

Here is the code:

if ($(this).scrollTop() < 200 && $el.css('position') == 'fixed'){
    $('.fixedElement').css({'position': 'relative', 'top': '200px'});
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I have links setup in a div so it is a vertical list of letter and number links.

#links {
    float:left;
    font-size:9pt;
    margin-left:0.5em;
    margin-right:1em;
    position:fixed;
    text-align:center;
    width:0.8em;
}

I then setup this handy jQuery function to save the loaded position and then change the position to fixed when scrolling beyond that position.

NOTE: this only works if the links are visible on page load!!

var listposition=false;
jQuery(function(){
     try{
        ///// stick the list links to top of page when scrolling
        listposition = jQuery('#links').css({'position': 'static', 'top': '0px'}).position();
        console.log(listposition);
        $(window).scroll(function(e){
            $top = $(this).scrollTop();
            $el = jQuery('#links');
            //if(typeof(console)!='undefined'){
            //    console.log(listposition.top,$top);
            //}
            if ($top > listposition.top && $el.css('position') != 'fixed'){
                $el.css({'position': 'fixed', 'top': '0px'});
            }
            else if ($top < listposition.top && $el.css('position') == 'fixed'){
                $el.css({'position': 'static'});
            }
        });

    } catch(e) {
        alert('Please vendor admin@mydomain.com (Myvendor JavaScript Issue)');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

I used some of the work above to create this tech. I improved it a bit and thought I would share my work. Hope this helps.

jsfuddle Code

function scrollErrorMessageToTop() {
    var flash_error = jQuery('#flash_error');
    var flash_position = flash_error.position();

    function lockErrorMessageToTop() {
        var place_holder = jQuery("#place_holder");
        if (jQuery(this).scrollTop() > flash_position.top && flash_error.attr("position") != "fixed") {
            flash_error.css({
                'position': 'fixed',
                'top': "0px",
                "width": flash_error.width(),
                "z-index": "1"
            });
            place_holder.css("display", "");
        } else {
            flash_error.css('position', '');
            place_holder.css("display", "none");
        }

    }
    if (flash_error.length > 0) {
        lockErrorMessageToTop();

        jQuery("#flash_error").after(jQuery("<div id='place_holder'>"));
        var place_holder = jQuery("#place_holder");
        place_holder.css({
            "height": flash_error.height(),
            "display": "none"
        });
        jQuery(window).scroll(function(e) {
            lockErrorMessageToTop();
        });
    }
}
scrollErrorMessageToTop();​

This is a little bit more dynamic of a way to do the scroll. It does need some work and I will at some point turn this into a pluging but but this is what I came up with after hour of work.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In javascript you can do:

var element = document.getElementById("myid");
element.style.position = "fixed";
element.style.top = "0%";
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not an exact solution but a great alternative to consider

this CSS ONLY Top of screen scroll bar. Solved all the problem with ONLY CSS, NO JavaScript, NO JQuery, No Brain work (lol).

Enjoy my fiddle :D all the codes are included in there :)

CSS

#menu {
position: fixed;
height: 60px;
width: 100%;
top: 0;
left: 0;
border-top: 5px solid #a1cb2f;
background: #fff;
-moz-box-shadow: 0 2px 3px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.16);
-webkit-box-shadow: 0 2px 3px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.16);
box-shadow: 0 2px 3px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.16);
z-index: 999999;
}

.w {
    width: 900px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    margin-bottom: 40px;
}<br type="_moz">

Put the content long enough so you can see the effect here :) Oh, and the reference is in there as well, for the fact he deserve his credit

CSS ONLY Top of screen scroll bar

share|improve this answer
    
A little bit offtopic ;) –  Tokk Jan 30 at 15:15
    
@Tokk, interesting, ppl against a good solution lol –  Adam Feb 18 at 0:28
    
I am not against a good solution, but the code in your answer provides a way to make something like a menu to always stick on top. But that was not the question... –  Tokk Feb 19 at 12:45
    
Well the menu itself is really a 'div' , so .... transferable? lol –  Adam Jul 9 at 18:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.