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It seems that in Python, to declare a variable in a class, it is static (keeps its value in the next instances). What better way to get around this problem?

class Foo():
  number = 0
  def set(self):
    self.number = 1


>>> foo = Foo()
>>> foo.number
0
>>> foo.set()
>>> foo.number
1
>>> new_foo = Foo()
>>> new_foo.number
1
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1  
While there is a shared Foo.number and you usually don't want that, it's not as bad as in your example. At the end new_foo.number will be 0. –  delnan Aug 28 '12 at 14:49
2  
Did you test the code you posted? new_foo.number should not be 1 in this case. –  mgilson Aug 28 '12 at 14:49
1  
If I run your code new_foo.number is zero. As you want it to be! Where is the problem? –  jimifiki Aug 28 '12 at 14:51
    
"What better way to get around this problem?" - Which part of this behaviour do you consider a problem? And what is the desired result after getting around it? –  Deestan Aug 28 '12 at 14:56
    
foo = Foo() provides an instance without a number attribute. When you ask for self.number since there is not the instance one you get the class one. When you set self.number the attribute number is given to self and Foo.number is kind of overriden... –  jimifiki Aug 28 '12 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Variables defined at the class level are indeed "static", but I don't think they work quite the way you think they do. There are 2 levels here which you need to worry about. There are attributes at the class level, and there are attributes at the instance level. Whenever you do self.attribute = ... inside a method, you're setting an attribute at the instance level. Whenever python looks up an attribute, it first looks at the instance level, if it doesn't find the attribute, it looks at the class level.

This can be a little confusing (especially if the attribute is a reference to a mutable object). consider:

class Foo(object):
    attr = []  #class level attribute is Mutable
    def __init__(self):
        # in the next line, self.attr references the class level attribute since
        # there is no instance level attribute (yet)
        self.attr.append('Hello')
        self.attr = []
        # Now, we've created an instance level attribute, so further appends will
        # append to the instance level attribute, not the class level attribute.
        self.attr.append('World')

a = Foo()
print (a.attr)  #['World']
print (Foo.attr) #['Hello']
b = Foo()
print (b.attr)  #['World']
print (Foo.attr) #['Hello', 'Hello']

As others have mentioned, if you want an attribute to be specific to an instance, just initialize it as an instance attribute in __init__ (using self.attr = ...). __init__ is a special method which is run whenever a class is initialized (with a few exceptions that we won't discuss here).

e.g.

class Foo(object):
   def __init__(self):
       self.attr = 0
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. To clarify, to "if you want an attribute to be specific to an instance, just initialize it as an instance attribute in init." I would add "and make it an instance attribute using 'self.'". Otherwise, the attribute will "disappear" when init exits. –  JS. Aug 28 '12 at 21:18

Just leave the declaration out. If you want to provide default values for the variables, initialize them in the __init__ method instead.

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.number = 0

    def set(self):
        self.number = 1

>>> foo = Foo()
>>> foo.number
0
>>> foo.set()
>>> foo.number
1
>>> new_foo = Foo()
>>> new_foo.number
0

Edit: replaced last line of the above snippet; it used to read 1 although it was just a typo on my side. Seems like it has caused quite a bit of confusion while I was away.

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2  
This doesn't work as advertised - new_foo.number is 0, not 1. Are you trying to make it static? –  jterrace Aug 28 '12 at 14:50
    
@jterrace my answer works –  jimifiki Aug 28 '12 at 15:01
    
But not the way your example says it does. –  delnan Aug 28 '12 at 15:39
1  
I did. Several times. I also copied and pasted it into the interactive prompt. I get 0 1 0, and no language change in the last ten years of so has any effect on the outcome. Now I even put it onto ideone for you to see. Try it out instead of claiming. I'd downvote you again if I could. –  delnan Aug 28 '12 at 16:13
1  
@ShankarCabus Your code it not equivalent to jimifiki (Foo.number instead of self.number in set). It is probably not the cleanest solution for what you actually want, but it does give 0 1 0. –  delnan Aug 28 '12 at 17:43

You maybe want to change the class attribute:

class Foo():
    number = 0
    def set(self):
        Foo.number = 1

instead of overriding it!

share|improve this answer
    
Same problem, @jimifiki. When instantiate a new Foo, number is 1, not 0. –  Shankar Cabus Aug 28 '12 at 16:17
    
I want 0, 1, 0! –  Shankar Cabus Aug 28 '12 at 17:25

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