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I want to use a dynamic object where I'd normally use Dictionary<string, string>. I want to go from

dict.Add("key", "value");
string val = dict["key"];

to

 dyna.key = "value";
 string val = dyna.key

Typical ExpandoObject will return an object for dyna.key, what's an easy way to make it return strings without casting when accessing each value?


EDIT: I'm sorry, I haven't dug enough into my problem --

It's not that the code I'm calling can't use it as a string, it has THIS:

public static implicit operator SomethingSomething(string name)

That's why it breaks

EDIT2: welp, I'm an idiot, only after recreating it from scratch did I read the full error message: has no applicable method named 'GetMyClass' but appears to have an extension method by that name. Extension methods cannot be dynamically dispatched. Consider casting the dynamic arguments or calling the extension method without the extension method syntax.

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Your "to" example already shows this... there's no cast ;p –  Marc Gravell Aug 28 '12 at 14:46
1  
Why can't you simply use a "normal" non-dynamic object? –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 28 '12 at 14:47
1  
Why don't you just use a Dictionary<string, string>? –  Jodrell Aug 28 '12 at 14:47
1  
If the objects are always Strings why do you see the need to go to a dynamic object ? –  user957902 Aug 28 '12 at 14:50
1  
@Madd0g: You could write your own class, no? Don't go dynamic if you don't need it just because the syntax is nicer. Use dictionary or roll a class if you don't want to use an indexer. –  Şafak Gür Aug 28 '12 at 15:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Typical ExpandoObject will return an object for dyna.key

Erm, not exactly, it will return whatever you tell it to return:

dynamic dyna = new ExpandoObject();
dyna.key = "value";
string val = dyna.key;

of course you can no longer rely on compile time checking and the following code will obviously crash at runtime:

dynamic dyna = new ExpandoObject();
dyna.key = "value";
int val = dyna.key;

So make sure that you are using the same type as the one used to store the value.


UPDATE:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        dynamic dyna = new ExpandoObject();
        dyna.key = "value";
        Test(dyna.key);
    }

    public static void Test(string message)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(message);
    }
}

UPDATE 2:

I still don't see what the problem is:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        dynamic d = new ExpandoObject();
        d.key = "value";
        Program p = d.key;
        Console.WriteLine(p.Name);
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator Program(string name)
    {
        return new Program
        {
            Name = name
        };
    }
}
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I need to pass them directly to methods expecting string, that doesn't work if I'm not using a variable, right? –  Madd0g Aug 28 '12 at 14:48
    
@Madd0g, and what's the problem with that? Are you having some specific issues? See my update. This will simply work. It's just that the type resolution happens at runtime. –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 28 '12 at 14:49
1  
@Madd0g: Why don't you just test it yourself?? –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 28 '12 at 14:50
1  
@Madd0g, I still don't see what the problem is. Please see my UPDATE 2. So are you willing to ask a real question, by telling us what your actual problem is in an easily reproducible code snippet, the way I post my answers? –  Darin Dimitrov Aug 28 '12 at 14:57
1  
Sorry Darin, I hadn't noticed it was an extension method, apparently extension methods can't work with dynamic objects. –  Madd0g Aug 28 '12 at 15:23

With dynamic, all casts are implicit, so:

dynamic key = ...
dyna.key = "value";
string val = dyna.key;

already does the job.

More accurately, the member-access (.key) returns dynamic, and this dynamic result has an implicit cast (a type-check, verified at runtime) to the target-type, string.

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