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I am building a web application where I want to distribute the code in various tiers like UI, Business logic and database. Here are my desired features which explain my usage scenario:

  • Real time high performant request-response type application
  • Application to be divided in various layers like UI, business logic and database- each layer working on a cluster of computers
  • The layers should support load balancing and failover features preferably transparent to other interacting layers.
  • Interoperability with various languages in future will be an additional desirable feature
  • These layers will be residing internally to my organization itself, i.e. I don't intend to interact with outside organization services at present.

I tried out RMI but drawbacks were Java lock-in and no support for load balancing and fail over features. I have considered JMS but realize that even though the features like load balancing, failover of MOM are very tempting, it doesn't seem suitable for real time request-response type application to me(Correct me if you think I am wrong).

Please suggest me good popular, suitable framework(s) that best suit in this use case scenario.

Update:
Exploring SOA, I come across the two prominent options SOAP and REST. As I mention, I have to make a choice interms a communication methodology to use internally between the modules/layers in my application. Is there an obvious/popular choice to make between them when looking for quick request-response and high scalability, load balancing, failover scenario? I don't intend to convert this post into REST vs. SOAP discussion, but if quick lite comparison can help in this case. I am also open for any third alternative if it's there in SOA which I am missing. Some examples from real world deployment scenarios will also help.

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closed as not constructive by LittleBobbyTables, Raedwald, madth3, greedybuddha, jesse mcconnell Jun 13 '13 at 0:45

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2 Answers 2

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Lets dig into you architectural requirements:

  1. Real time high performant request-response type application

    • if you are probably trying to achieve almost zero the application latency, then you must cache amost everything near the web layer, like memcached, and postpone or make updates asynchronously.
    • consider also using REST, it demands less overhead than SOAP, and you can use JSON as document format which is also more compact than XML, lowering network throughput requirements.
  2. Application to be divided in various tiers like UI, business logic and database- each layer working on a cluster of computers:

    • The more tiers you use, the more latency your application probably have, database is the least scaleable item from almost every architecture, then you must try to avoid hitting it for every request, you will definitely need a powerful cache.
  3. The tiers should support load balancing and failover features preferably transparent to other interacting tiers:

    • in order to increase scaleability and failover you must seek service statelessness because session state synchronization between servers is very expensive and load balancer with sticky sessions, will be a problem when a single server crashes.
    • HTTP load balancers can be very transparent.
  4. Interoperability with various languages in future will be an additional desirable feature

    • SOAP have more fancy features that are not well supported in all languages, if you use REST you will be probably more safe here. REST interfaces are usually more simpler to design and less dependent on specific technology than SOAP's WSDL.
  5. These layers will be residing internally to my organization itself, i.e. I don't intend to interact with outside organization services at present.

    • If you think you will have interaction with other services outside your service repository, you have to know that if you don't use standards, you will probably need a kind of gateway tier that would do message translation.
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Indeed a very helpful answer @alessandro. As for the scalability how much useful it will be to use naming service/directory to remove dependency on knowing the exact IP addresses etc. Will something like that help in this kind of architecture? And what are the options available in such case. –  Atharva Aug 29 '12 at 11:38
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If your application servers sit behind a load balancer they will have a single IP address, then you probably won't need the service registry for this. Service registry is more common on large organizations, but oftentimes they are underused, specially when the architecture team demands that all the services should be deployed on ESB, because ESB software usually have fairly good service searching capabilities for human use. –  Alessandro Oliveira Aug 29 '12 at 12:10
    
Okay so you mean the client service will only need to know the ip address of load balancer and then the load balancer will be knowing the ip addresses of all the server nodes. So how exactly will the client come to know about the ip address of load balancer and how the load balancer will come to know the ip of server nodes. Should the IP addresses be hard coded or passed as run time arguments to client and load balancer or some other service (like naming or service registry) serving wii be better at serving this purpose? –  Atharva Aug 29 '12 at 12:28
    
Usually you might give the loadbalancer IP a DNS name, or if you are not using DNS, you would put this name in a /etc/hosts file or configuration file, not hardcoded. Usually the Load Balancers must have an API that allow servers to self register in order to receive requests, for example: AWS Elastic Load Balancer see: Best Practices in Evaluating Elastic Load Balancing. Please also check this registry for restful services article. –  Alessandro Oliveira Aug 29 '12 at 13:43
    
Thanks for the pointers. It helped me discovering one very useful resource on using DNS for RESTful service discovery. I came across the links in one of the comments on the article pointed by you. –  Atharva Aug 29 '12 at 15:00

Real-time and distributed are kinda inversely proportional.

Yes, JMS based solution is suited more for asynchronousness and not right for realtime.

For the kind of implementaion you are envisioning a distributed SOA services (yes web services) solution seems a good fit. With services running on a load balanced clustered environment providing high availability. Depends how much real time you need.

That said, if you dont see a need for outside interaction then running a straight deployment with ui-service-dao/dal layer deployed as one bundle on app server is more realtime. You can still achieve load balancing and failover with clustered nodes that support session fail over. This may not provide interoperability, but you could provide a wrapper for that when you really need it.

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