Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

So, I'm trying to use the following trigger so that, when a row in a table is updated, it'll set a specific column to a string of 8 random alphanumeric characters. The trigger works fine except that the result must be unique. It'll be blank before the trigger so this uniqueness is not enforced on the server. The idea is that once a customer is far enough along in a process, they'll get this string but not before as we get plenty of customers who don't get that far.

The trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER test_rand
ON test_trigger
AFTER UPDATE 
AS
    UPDATE test_trigger set col2=(select
    Random_String =
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)+
    substring(x,(abs(checksum(newid()))%36)+1,1)

from
          (select x='0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ') a) WHERE col2=''; 
GO

this trigger is the test that I'm running with a simple table that only has two columns, col1 and col2. I update col1 for a bunch of rows and col2 gets the seemingly random values, however I know that two rows could get the same number and I'd like to prevent that if possible.

I had thought to do a check in the select statement itself where that string doesn't exist but I haven't been able to come up with a good way to do that.

I'm new to triggers so if there's something simple I'm missing or that should have been searched then I apologize for wasting your time. This might not even be possible for all I know but I figured I should ask before giving up and trying something else.

Also, the reason this is not being done in the script that does the update is that I can't get a straight answer out of the client as to what scripts actually do that. If this isn't possible I'll just write a task to be run by Windows Task Scheduler but I was hoping to do this instead.

MY SOLUTION

Based off what usr told me, I've created the following code which did what I wanted:

CREATE TRIGGER test_rand
ON test_trigger
AFTER UPDATE 
AS
    DECLARE @Ins_Col3 int;
    DECLARE Ins_Curs CURSOR FOR SELECT col3 FROM inserted;
    DECLARE @Ref char(8);

    OPEN Ins_Curs

    FETCH NEXT FROM Ins_Curs
    INTO @Ins_Col3;

    WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN;
        SET @Ref = LEFT(NEWID(), 8);

        WHILE(EXISTS(SELECT col2 from test_trigger WHERE col2=@Ref))
        BEGIN;
            SET @Ref = LEFT(NEWID(), 8);
        END;

        UPDATE test_trigger SET test_trigger.col2=@Ref FROM inserted WHERE test_trigger.col3=@Ins_Col3;
            FETCH NEXT FROM Ins_Curs
        INTO @Ins_Col3;
    END;

I had to add col3 as an auto-incremented id value so that I could identify each row. col1 is therefore only there so that I have something to change with an update statement.

share|improve this question
    
Your code should work, but I'm not sure how good a random number you can get from the first eight bytes of the GUID. See blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2008/06/27/8659071.aspx – aaaa bbbb Sep 13 '12 at 22:40
    
I think you should try to talk your customer into using a UniqueIdentifier field. The NEWID() function will always give you a unique string. You will get a performance boost because you won't spin trying to make sure your value isn't in the DB already. The UniqueIdentifier is only 128 bits. Your eight character field is at least 64 bits. An additional 64 bits for the performance boost is worth it. – aaaa bbbb Sep 13 '12 at 22:44
    
It's not about performance however. It's about having customers use this as a way to identify someone who's referred them and the client didn't thinks that having it any longer might be a problem for people typing it in or writing it down. This is also for a test system and may not even last more than a month or two. If they do decide to keep it longer then I'll likely talk to them about making it longer. – sparrow Sep 14 '12 at 18:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to prevent that from happening, include a WHILE loop in your trigger, looping as long as the generated string is not valid due to violating the uniqueness condition:

WHILE 0=0
BEGIN
 SET_TO_NEW_VALUE
 IF(NEW_VALUE_IS_UNIQUE)
  BREAK
END

You can also ROLLBACK and RAISEERROR if the value is not unique. Depends on what you want to happen.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that more than one row could trip this at a time so if I did what you're suggesting they'll all get the same value unless there's a way to iterate through all the rows affected by the update that I've been unable to find. – sparrow Aug 28 '12 at 17:17
    
You can iterate all rows affected using the INSERTED and DELETED pseudo-tables. You can either iterate them using a cursor or mass-assign them using update statements. – usr Aug 28 '12 at 18:00
    
And that's what I've gone and done. I'm posting my finished code in the question in case others want to see it. – sparrow Aug 29 '12 at 14:23
    
This solution will work, but might have bad performance. For my money, the cost of 64 more bits to use a GUID (a UniqueIdentifier) is worth it for the performance and the simpler code. Future viewers to this answer should weigh their options carefully. – aaaa bbbb Sep 13 '12 at 22:47

You should use a GUID instead of kludging an 8 char string. In SQL Server it is a UniqueIdentifier column type. Here is an article on it: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190215(v=sql.105).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could use that but I don't think I can. If I've read the link correctly, to make sure that the UniqueIdentifier is unique, I need to add that constraint onto the row. However, I need to allow the column to be NULL until an action takes place, which violates the constraint. I may talk to the client and see if they're okay with changing that however so I can use this. Thank you for pointing it out as my google searching had not turned that up. – sparrow Aug 28 '12 at 16:42
    
A UniqueIdentifier value is guaranteed to always be a unique value. You are correct that a unique constraint in the column will not permit two rows to be null. (Oracle is better than SQL Server on this point). Maybe you could always have a value in the UniqueIdentifier column, and use another column to represent whatever you intended for the null value? Or maybe trusting the UniqueIdentifier to be unique? (It will be). – aaaa bbbb Aug 28 '12 at 18:37
    
I just re-read the article that I linked. The part where they specify that the UniqueIdentifier value cab appear more than once unless you place a constraint needs more clarification. What they are saying is that if your application code gets a GUID value, you can insert that single GUID value into as many rows as you want. The article is NOT saying that you might get duplicate GUID values accidentally after you insert one. The value given back by NEWID function or by appcode that gets a new GUID will always be unique. – aaaa bbbb Aug 28 '12 at 18:48
    
Alright, that makes more sense than what I was reading yesterday. That part didn't seem clear and I wasn't about to waste my time creating a gigantic table to test that. Thank you for your time and help, unfortunately the client doesn't want something that long so that, while I'm still using the NEWID() function, I'm only taking a fraction of it so I still have to check for uniqueness and have gone with a slightly longer version of what usr suggested below. – sparrow Aug 29 '12 at 14:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.