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I have the following csv file:

name, sector, year, region, number

bob,,1999,AS,2

bob,hi-tech,,,3

mike,,2001,NE,2

plan,pharma,,,1

I wrote a script that finds every instance where "name" is the same for a row and the row below it (the csv file is already sorted by "name" values). The output of my current script is the following:

name, sector, year, region, number

bob,tennis,1999,AS,2+3

bob,tennis,,,3

mike,,2001,NE,2

plan, baseball,,,1

This is almost what I want. What is good about my current script is that it identifies every instance where the value of "name" is the same, and then combines all the attributes of the two rows with that name, and updates the "number" column. The problem with my script is that both of the rows that go into the merge should be deleted once the new row is created. In the above example, the second line:

bob,tennis,,,3

should not be here. I've reproduced the relevant section of my actual script below and would greatly appreciate any clarification anyone can provide.

for next_row in reader:
        first_name = first_row['name']
        next_name = next_row['name']

        if first_name == next_name:
            if first_row['source'] == '2':
                #get relevant attributes from next_row and add them to first_row

                first_row['number'] = first_row['number'] + ' + ' + next_row['number']
            elif next_row['number'] == '2':
                #get relevant attributes from next_row and add them to first_row

                first_row['number'] = first_row['number'] + ' + ' + next_row['number']
            writer.writerow(first_row)
            first_row = next_row
        else:
            writer.writerow(first_row)

            first_row = next_row
share|improve this question
    
You could probably group your 2 tests on if first_row...elif first_row in a single shot. –  Pierre GM Aug 28 '12 at 15:22
    
Have you control on reader? Would it be possible to make it an iterator, for example? That way, if next_name==first_name, you could call a iterator.next() to skip one line: you would then compare first_row with the next next_row... –  Pierre GM Aug 28 '12 at 15:24
    
Oh, and are you sure you really need the writer.writerow in the if first_row['source']... test? –  Pierre GM Aug 28 '12 at 15:37
    
Hey, thanks man. Yeah I know this isn't the most elegant of programs, it would be better to do the if, elif in one. On a high level, I just want the program to skip next_row if the name in first_row and next_row is the same. It's a little tricky for me to figure out how to do that, though. –  user1590499 Aug 28 '12 at 20:16
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As suggested in a comment, you may want to use an iterator for reader. If reader has a next method, you're OK; otherwise, you can use reader=iter(reader).

First, define your first_row: you could simply do first_row = reader.next().

Then, it's only a matter of trying one entry after the other: you'll write your line and update your first_row only when it's no longer equal to next_row.

Once the iterator is totally consumed, a StopIteration is raised. You just have to write the last first_row.

try:
    while True:
        next_row = reader.next()
        if first_row["name"] == next_row["name"]:
            ...do_something...
        else:
            writer.writerow(first_row)
            first_row = next_row
except StopIteration:
    writer.writerow(first_row)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man. This works perfectly! –  user1590499 Aug 29 '12 at 17:57
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