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Having created an own number type (actually DoubleDouble), I want to implement the IFormattable interface. So I have to somehow parse the format string.

public string ToString(string format, IFormatProvider formatProvider) {
    // formatting string according to format and using formatprovider?
    return formattedString;
}

The user of the class should be able to use it as a replacement for double (or any other number format).

String.Format("{0:0.##}", (DoubleDouble)123.4567);

My question is, does someone know a good tutorial about this or can give me some hints? How to support localizing in this process?

How to parse the format string? Are there some methods to aid in this task or do I have to do it all by "hand" with regexp and such?

I really searched for help but couldn't find any, if you find something in another language (C,C++) that may help, please tell me about it.

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1  
I'd start with standard strings before I got on to the custom variety. What about localization? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dwhawy9k.aspx –  Jodrell Aug 28 '12 at 15:51
    
I found this quite useful - codebetter.com/davidhayden/2006/03/12/… –  Nate-Wilkins Aug 28 '12 at 16:03
    
I already have a ToString method that returns a scientific notation. The problem I am facing is, how to parse a format string and return a corresponding number. The given link just uses very basic modifiers. –  John Deo Aug 28 '12 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

Maybe this can help you:

var my = DoFormat(123.0)

public static string DoFormat( double myNumber )
{

    var s = string.Format("{0:0.00}", myNumber);

    if ( s.EndsWith("00") )
    {
        return ((int)myNumber).ToString();
    }
    else
    {
        return s;
   }
}
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MSDN has a nice example of a Temperature class that implements the IFormattable interface with its own custom format.

I think you know this already; anyway, today I learned that if your DoubleDouble class implemented the IFormattable interface then:

String.Format("{0:0.##}", (DoubleDouble)123.4567);

... would call the DoubleDouble class's ToString(...) implementation with the specific format "0.##" as the first parameter, which I suspect is close to what you want. You still have to parse that part of the format though.

I would hazard a guess that much of the format parsing is embedded deep in the highly optimised .Net library binaries, so you don't get any custom parsing virtual methods to help.

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Ok, I just realised that Nate's comment to question above already links to a great tutorial. My last paragraph is the only new thing here. –  wardies Jan 12 '13 at 22:01

How to support localizing in this process?

Something like the following:

public string ToString(string format, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
{
  CultureInfo culture = formatProvider as CultureInfo;
  if (culture != null)
  {
    // Now you can do things like 
    // culture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator, etc.
  }
}

How to parse the format string? Are there some methods to aid in this task or do I have to do it all by "hand" with regexp and such?

There's no public API in the .NET framework to do it for you. If you look at the source for the .NET primitive numeric types' implementation of IFormattable, they all eventually call external methods, so they provide no insight. You'll probably need to use something like RegEx's to parse the format string. Then you can divide by the largest power of 10 to figure out what the first digit of output will be, subtract that out, then repeat for the lesser power's of 10 until you have generated all the digits.

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I had written a JavaScript number formatting function a few years ago that mimicked most of the .NET way of parsing format strings. It may be of some help for you in writing a C# version of it. At the very least it can give you a starting point.

https://github.com/flamewave/jquery-ui-numeric/blob/master/jquery-ui-numeric.js

Scroll all the way down to the bottom to the $.formatNumber function.

Note: I no longer maintain this function in favor of using the Globalize library, which also may give you some insight into parsing format strings.

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