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I have the following situation:

A---B---F---G---H (master)
     \
      \
       C---D---E (experimental)

My problem is that B is a very-very bad thing that shouldn't have happened on master. It belongs on experimental. However F---G---H are okay. Is there a way to make everything look like this:

A---F'---G'---H' (master)
\
 \
  B---C---D---E (experiment)

I've read about rebase and stuff like that but the biggest problem is that master has been pushed to origin.

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Are there too many people in the team to inform manually should you rebase master? If so, you may simply be able to git revert B –  bcmcfc Aug 28 '12 at 16:04
    
I need to keep B on experiment branch –  devmiles.com Aug 28 '12 at 16:08
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

git rebase --onto A B master will do.

Seems you have master already pushed to orgin, if you are certain that it is safe to overwrite master branch of the origin, just do a git push -f on master branch. Be aware that it may cause other developers have a conflict when they pull from origin.

Generally, branch in public repo should stay untouched, which means you can not expect removing commit B from the master, all you can do is fixing the mistake introduced by commit B in a new commit and push it to master again.

If it is possiable to inform your team members about the rebase and you insist to do so, then it is okay for a rewrite, just make sure this won't happer too often.

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This sort of contradicts Do not rebase commits that you have pushed to a public repository. from git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Rebasing –  devmiles.com Aug 28 '12 at 16:04
1  
Yes, but what you are asking is a rewrite of the history which git rebase is just the tool for this condition. Generally, branch in public repo should stay as it is, which means you can not expect remove commit B in master, all you can do is fixing the mistake introduced by B in a new commit and push it again. But if it is possiable to inform your team members about the rebase, than it is okay for a rewrite, just make sure this won't happer too often. –  Techlive Zheng Aug 28 '12 at 16:09
    
I'm gonna use this option. Thanks! –  devmiles.com Aug 28 '12 at 16:19
    
What's up with the minus? Any comments? –  devmiles.com Aug 28 '12 at 17:41
    
I don't konw either, but I guess someone just thought it is not a good practice to do so. I have updated the answer with some points from the comments which might be able to help making it clear. –  Techlive Zheng Aug 28 '12 at 18:03
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On master, run:

git revert B

You can then push safely, if the changes downstream of that commit are not impacted by it directly (i.e. it the contents of the commit B can be removed without upsetting the other changes that came after it. It certainly sounds like this is the case.)

This would create:

A---B---F---G---H---I (master)
     \
      \
       C---D---E (experimental)

Where I is the revert commit. Master keeps its history whilst removing the contents of B, experimental retains B's changes.

You may have to revert commit I if you later merge experimental into master.

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2  
Thanks for your answer but it makes history look complicated, so I think I'm going to risk making my 2 fellow developers angry and go with rebase. +1 for you though. –  devmiles.com Aug 28 '12 at 16:18
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