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For some reason within my console application I cannot get my finally block to run. I was writing this code to test how the finally block works so it is very simple:

static void Main()
{
    int i = 0;
    try
    {
        int j = 1 / i; // Generate a divide by 0 exception.
    }
    finally
    {

        Console.Out.WriteLine("Finished");
        Console.In.ReadLine();
    }
}

At first I had the problem described here but then I tried to run the program outside Visual Studio I got a "Program has stopped responding" error.

Edit: I am using try-finally so I should not need to catch the exception

share|improve this question
    
Hm, I'm not quite familar with C#, but you aren't catching the division by zero exception at all...maybe this is the error? –  akluth Aug 28 '12 at 16:00
    
Try taking out the ReadLine and run it in a command prompt outside Visual Studio. What happens then ? –  user957902 Aug 28 '12 at 16:04
    
I've tried that. It acts the same. –  Fr33dan Aug 28 '12 at 16:05
2  
See this: stackoverflow.com/questions/3421738/… –  vpascoal Aug 28 '12 at 16:06
1  
Works fine for me - I get the unhandled exception error box, I select 'Close the program' and then the code in the finally block runs - display Finished and wait for ENTER to be pressed. –  MiMo Aug 28 '12 at 16:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because you do not have a top level exception handler, the .Net runtime is catching the exception for you and aborting the program before the finally has a chance to run. This illustrates the point:

static void Main() 
{
  try
  {
      int i = 0;
      try
      {
         int j = 1 / i; // Generate a divide by 0 exception.
      }
      finally
      {
          Console.Out.WriteLine("Finished");
          Console.In.ReadLine();     
      }
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
      Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
  }
}

The catch need not be in the same function where the exception is being raised, it can be anywhere in the calling chain.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Thank you for explaining that you do need a catch block, but unlike other answers, outside of the scope of the try-finally block in question. –  Steve Guidi Aug 28 '12 at 16:13
    
I understand, the exception is passed to the higher level before the finally is called. Since there is no higher level the program halts and quits before the finally. But does this mean I can never be sure that my finally will run since I may not know the status of the calling chain? –  Fr33dan Aug 28 '12 at 16:29
    
No. Finallys will always run. The only case they don't is when you have a major problem with your code (unhandled exception which is not caught anywhere). The runtime does not know what to do with the exception so the code cannot proceed... –  Killercam Aug 28 '12 at 16:33
    
Right so if I'm writing a single method I cannot be sure exceptions thrown within the try will eventually be caught by something. So in such a context I cannot guarantee my finally will be called (unless I catch the exceptions myself) –  Fr33dan Aug 28 '12 at 16:45

In a larger program this would not be a problem as the DevideByZero exception would "bubble-up" and would hopefully be dealt with somewhere else. Because this is in the main method, the exception has no where to go. This causes the problem you see...

So the following would do as you expect

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        CatchTest();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {

    }
}

private static void CatchTest()
{
    int i = 0;
    try
    {
        int j = 1 / i; // Generate a divide by 0 exception.    
    }
    finally
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("Finished");
        Console.In.ReadLine();
    }
}

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
2  
Downvoter care to comment? –  Killercam Aug 28 '12 at 16:17
1  
+1. This answer is OK to me. –  ShellShock Aug 28 '12 at 16:30

You still need a catch to capture the exception throwing:

int i = 0;
        try
        {
            int j = 1 / i; // Generate a divide by 0 exception.
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Console.Out.WriteLine("Exception caught");
        }
        finally
        {

            Console.Out.WriteLine("Finished");
            Console.In.ReadLine();
        }

This exception is causing the application to crash, and the exception is unhandled therefore terminating the application.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zwc8s4fz(v=vs.100).aspx

Usually, when an unhandled exception ends an application, whether or not the finally block is run is not important. However, if you have statements in a finally block that must be run even in that situation, one solution is to add a catch block to the try-finally statement.

share|improve this answer
    
No because I'm trying to use try-finally: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zwc8s4fz%28v=vs.71%29.aspx –  Fr33dan Aug 28 '12 at 16:01
    
Again, when there's an error you never get to the finally. –  carny666 Aug 28 '12 at 16:07
    
No. This is not right. The finally block will always get called as long as the exception has somewhere to go. In this case it doesn't... –  Killercam Aug 28 '12 at 16:11
    
@carny666 it's happening because he's running it in a debugger, if he runs it in release mode the finally will be executed. See this question for more details: stackoverflow.com/questions/3421738/… application-while-using-f5 –  Lirik Aug 28 '12 at 16:11
    
@Lirik yup.. I get that now. –  carny666 Aug 28 '12 at 16:12

You need to detach the debugger (e.g. run your application in Release mode), see the following (related) question for more details: finally doesn't seem to execute in C# console application while using F5

share|improve this answer
    
I actually mention this issue and reference that question in my question. I've tried running it outside the debugger. –  Fr33dan Aug 28 '12 at 16:25

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