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I'm currently building an Android app and have just implemented a disclaimer dialog box that pops up when the app is first run. The user is presented with two options: accept or reject. If they accept, all is well, the app runs, and they are never asked again. If they reject, the dialog box persists and a message informs them that they must accept the disclaimer in order to use the app.

I know that 99.99% of the population will accept whatever disclaimer is thrown at them, but I was just wondering what the implications would be if a user pays for an app (or any software), and then is faced with a disclaimer that they don't agree to. As a consumer, do they have an a priori right to use any software they've paid for (regardless of whether they accept the terms of the agreement), or should the licence agreement be set out for them prior to purchase (for example in the app store for mobile apps)?

If they're entitled to a refund (which I suspect is the case), is this usually handled by the distributor (in my case, this will be the Google Play store)? This is my first attempt at creating an app and I'm trying to work out whether it's worth the hassle of making it a paid app or just keeping it free.

This follows on from this question, in which I asked how to prevent the 'back' button from dismissing a dialog box in Android.

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I know that 99.99% of the population will accept whatever disclaimer is thrown at them, but I was just wondering what the implications would be if a user pays for an app (or any software), and then is faced with a disclaimer that they don't agree to.

The worst case the user complains to the market place and requests a refund. They also likely will leave bad feedback, talk poorly about your program if you don't issue a refund, any number of things that could hurt your reputation.

As a consumer, do they have an a priori right to use any software they've paid for (regardless of whether they accept the terms of the agreement), or should the licence agreement be set out for them prior to purchase (for example in the app store for mobile apps)?

They have to agree to your license in order to use your product but if they decline they have the right to get their money back. My suggestion is only allow them to purchase the application AFTER they agree to the license.

If they're entitled to a refund (which I suspect is the case), is this usually handled by the distributor (in my case, this will be the Google Play store)? This is my first attempt at creating an app and I'm trying to work out whether it's worth the hassle of making it a paid app or just keeping it free.

I am not familar with how everything "behind the scenes" in an Android application store, my guess they request the refund and as the publisher you "approve" "deny" said request.

You are in a better position to research this....

I will again repeat that my suggestion would be to have them AGREE to the license BEFORE they purchase the application. This way a refund because of isn't in question because of a license.

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