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Is there a way to performing calculations based on value of some other column within same or different table using the Default Value property (that is, the DEFAULT clause on a column definition) of MySQL ?

We can set static default values to any column but can we perform calculations or query other tables' data ??

EDIT

Let's say a table with column for marks and other with total_marks and third column percentage. How to set default value of percentage to be calculated from the former two columns

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1  
Yes. If you provide some more information perhaps we can give you more ideas. –  Kermit Aug 28 '12 at 16:09
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No. The value for the DEFAULT clause must be a constant. (The one exception to this rule is the use of CURRENT_TIMESTAMP as a default value for a TIMESTAMP column.)

As an alternative, you can use a TRIGGER to set a value for a column when a row is inserted or updated.

For example, within a BEFORE INSERT FOR EACH ROW trigger, you can perform calculations from values supplied for other columns and/or query data from other tables.


EDIT

For the example given in the EDIT of the question, an example starting point for a trigger definition:

CREATE TRIGGER mytable_bi 
BEFORE INSERT ON mytable 
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  SET NEW.percentage = (100.0 * NEW.marks) / NULLIF(NEW.total_marks,0);
END
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I had misunderstood the question. Using a trigger is the right answer! +1 for managing to work out what was being asked :) –  eggyal Aug 28 '12 at 16:27
    
i too believe triggers are the way to go but I wanted to know if Default value could handle it. I guess it can't. –  tGilani Aug 28 '12 at 16:35
    
I had trouble with running this until I understood a problem I was having with delimiters. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/trigger-syntax.html, which says "if you use the mysql program to define a trigger that executes multiple statements, it is necessary to redefine the mysql statement delimiter so that you can use the ; statement delimiter within the trigger definition". –  Tyler Collier Aug 6 '13 at 22:14
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