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This is a question from a past exam paper. The question asks to declare a variable c of type Counter in a new class. I should then intialise it to a new instance of Counter with n taking a value of 100. I must then increment its n field twice. Then print the value of the n field to System.out.

I have done both classes, but i am not sure about the Counter2 class. I think i may be declaring the Counter variable wrong.

public class Counter {
    private int n;
    public int x;

    public Counter(int theN){
        this.n=theN;
    }

    public int getN(){
        return n;
    }

    public void inc(){
        x = 1+ getN();
    }
}

public class Counter2{
    Counter c;

    public int incrementTwice(){
        int i = 0;

        while(i<2){
            c.inc();
            i++;
        }
        return c.x;
    }

    public static void main (String[] args){
        c = new Counter(100);
        int finalResult = c.getN();
        System.out.println(finalResult);
    }
}
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@Nambari, just tried static but it just prints 100. Guessing there is something wrong with my while loop –  nsc010 Aug 28 '12 at 16:17
    
Counter c = new Counter(100); –  akluth Aug 28 '12 at 16:17
3  
I don't understand the question (and the title even less). In Counter2 you'd need to actually instantiate a Counter in order to do anything useful with it, but it's not clear what you're trying to do. –  Dave Newton Aug 28 '12 at 16:17
    
I need to increment the n field (100) twice. And then print the n field. So the aim is to get 102. –  nsc010 Aug 28 '12 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In inc() you are not actually incrementing n. You are setting x to n+1.

So, it does not matter how many times you run inc, before the first run you will have n = initial Value and x=0, after the first run and following you have n = initialValue and x = n + 1

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the first part of the question asked me to create a public method inc that adds 1 to n and returns no result. So i'm guessing i have to use this method to increment 100 to 102. –  nsc010 Aug 28 '12 at 16:25
1  
That is not what you inc is doing. –  SJuan76 Aug 28 '12 at 16:26
    
Yeah thanks i changed the inc() method to n = 1+ getN();. Made a few tweaks and it works now –  nsc010 Aug 28 '12 at 16:40
    
@nsc010 - inc() method would be best as simply n += 1 or n = n + 1 or even n++; there's no need to call getN() since you're within the Counter class already. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Aug 28 '12 at 16:42
    
@RoddyoftheFrozenPeas, yeah thanks for that, that makes sense. I have modified my code now. –  nsc010 Aug 28 '12 at 16:46
public static void main (String[] args){

    c = new Counter(100);

    int finalResult = c.getN();
    System.out.println(finalResult);
}

I would expect the output to be 100

The call stack would be the following:

1) Set c.N = 100;  
2) set finalResult = c.X (100)  
3) Print finalResult (100)

You never make a call to incrementTwice. Your main should be the following:

public static void main (String[] args){
    Counter2 counter2 = new Counter2();  
    counter2.c.n = 100;  
    counter2.incrementTwice();
    int finalResult = counter2.c.getN();
    System.out.println(finalResult);
}

The key is that in inc() you are adding to x and not adding to n so you need to return x

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  • Why have a while loop? Why not just increment it in two lines. That would be clearer in my opinion
  • Personally I wouldn't use getN() in your inc method. This is a public interface to the class. I would access the n variable directly eg x = 1 + n;

  • You dont need x and n. Just increment n. This could be causing the problem as you are always incrementing a value (n) that is never changing. You need to reassign to n if you want to increment twice.

I would do just

n+=2

to add two to n

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Assuming n is the value of the counter, "declare a variable c of type Counter" and "initialize it to a new instance... taking a value of 100" would be accomplished like this: Counter c = new Counter(100);. Incrementing its value twice would be as simple as this:

int value = c.getValue(); 
value++;
value++;
c.setValue(value);

... assuming that getValue() is defined as the method that gets the Counter's variable.

So putting it all together is as simple as this:

public class MyClass {
    private Counter c;

    public MyClass() {
        c = new Counter(100);
    }

    public void increment() {
        int value = c.getValue();
        value++;
        c.setValue(value);
    }

    public void printCounterValue() {
        System.out.println(c.getValue());
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyClass instance = new MyClass(); // creates new class with Counter c initialized to 100
        instance.increment(); // increment once
        instance.increment(); // increment twice
        instance.printCounterValue(); // print to screen
    }
}

Of course this could be simplified further -- incrementing could be as simple as creating a method in the Counter class called increment() which simply does n++, for example -- but this is a basic implementation of the solution.

(Implementing the increment() in Counter would look something like this:)

public void increment() {
    n++; // equivalent to n = n+1 or n+= 1
}
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