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#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <conio.h>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class CText
{
private:
char* pText;

public:
// Function to display text
void ShowIt() const
{
cout << pText << endl;
}

// Constructor
CText(const char* pStr="No text")
{
cout << "CText constructor called." << endl;
size_t len(strlen(pStr)+1);
pText = new char[len];     // Allocate space for text
strcpy_s(pText, len, pStr);     // Copy text to new memory
}

// Copy constructor definition
CText(const CText txt)
{
cout << "CText copy constructor called." << endl;
size_t len(strlen(txt.pText)+1);
pText = new char[len];
strcpy_s(pText, len, txt.pText);
}

// Move copy constructor definition
CText(CText& txt)
{
cout << "CText move copy constructor called." << endl;
pText = txt.pText;
txt.pText = 0;
}

// Destructor to free memory allocated by new
~CText()
{
cout << "CText destructor called." << endl;     // Just to track what happens
delete[] pText;     // Free memory assigned to pointer
}

// Overloaded assignment operator for CText objects
CText operator=(const CText txt)
{
cout << "CText assignment operator function called." << endl;
if(this == &txt)     // Check addresses, if equal
return *this;     //     return the 1st operand

delete[] pText;     // Release memory for 1st operand
size_t len(strlen(txt.pText)+1);
pText = new char[len];

// Copy 2nd operand string to 1st
strcpy_s(this->pText, len, txt.    pText);

//     return a reference to 1st operand
return *this;
}

// Overloaded assignment operator for CText objects
CText operator=(CText& txt)
{
cout << "CText move assignment operator function called." << endl;
delete[] pText;     // Release memory for 1st operand
pText = txt.pText;
txt.pText = 0;

//     return a reference to 1st operand
return *this;
}

// Overloaded addition operator
CText operator+(const CText txt) const
{
cout << "CText add operator function called." << endl;
size_t len(strlen(pText) + strlen(txt.pText) + 1);
CText aText;
aText.    pText = new char[len]; 
strcpy_s(aText.pText, len, pText);
strcat_s(aText.pText, len, txt.pText);
return aText;
}
};

class CMessage
{
private:
CText text;     // Object text string

public:
// Function to display a message
void ShowIt() const
{
text.ShowIt();
}

// Overloaded addition operator
CMessage operator+(const CMessage& aMess) const
{
cout << "CMessage add operator function called." << endl;
CMessage message;
message.text = text + aMess.text;
return message;
}

// Copy assignment operator for CMessage objects
CMessage& operator=(const CMessage& aMess)
{
cout << "CMessage copy assignment operator function called." << endl;
if(this == &aMess)     // Check addresses, if equal
return *this;     //     return the 1st operand

text = aMess.text;
return *this;     //     return a reference to 1st operand
}

// Constructor definition
CMessage(const char* str = "Default message")
{
cout << "CMessage constructor called." << endl;
text = CText(str);
}

// Copy constructor definition
CMessage(const CMessage& aMess)
{
cout << "CMessage copy constructor called." << endl;
text = aMess.text;
}



};

void main()
{
CMessage motto1("The devil takes care of his own. ");
getch();
}

Following output was printed on the screen:

CText constructor called.
CMessage constructor called.
CText constructor called.
CText move assignment operator function called.
CText destructor called.
CText destructor called.

Please tell me why was CText constructor called two times? Or why was it called the second time?

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closed as too localized by jman, Michael Petrotta, Bo Persson, Wooble, Rob Kennedy Aug 28 '12 at 18:04

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Using the word move in your copy constructor and assignment operator printouts is misleading. –  chris Aug 28 '12 at 16:40
    
Please format your code appropriately –  Paul R Aug 28 '12 at 16:41
1  
1) Format the code. 2) You tell us what you think. 3) We will verify or correct your assumptions. –  Loki Astari Aug 28 '12 at 16:42
1  
Have you read a good book on C++? At least the introductory chapters? –  Nim Aug 28 '12 at 16:42
1  
Do you have access to a debugger? Set a breakpoint on the first line of main, and use the step-in function to answer the question yourself. –  Scott Langham Aug 28 '12 at 16:43

1 Answer 1

CText constructor called.

Was printed because the CText constructor was called

CMessage constructor called.

Was printed because the CMessage constructor was called

CText constructor called.

Was printed because the CText constructor was called

CText move assignment operator function called.

Was printed because the CText Copy Constructor was called

CText destructor called.

Was printed because the CText destructor was called

CText destructor called.

Was printed because the CText destructor was called

Constructors are called when you first make an object (instance of a class)

Destructors are called to destroy that object (instance of a class) when it is done being used.

Copy constructors are called when you create a new instance of a class and you pass in a reference to an existing object of the same type.

Someone else mentioned to use a debugger to step through this. I agree with them.

Read a few chapters in a C++ book and all of this is explained in detail. Also, for future reference, when you ask a question try to provide more details of what you have tried in order to solve it yourself. You will be met with a lot of down votes if you do not show that you are also involved in the problem solving process.

EDIT:

Here is a detailed trace through what functions are called to address the OP's question below

Line1 Main(): CMessage object is asked to be made The compiler initializes all of the class memebers that Cmessage has (Note: it has a Ctext) Ctext constructor called to construct it (constructor call #1)

The compiler then calls your CMessage constructor: Line 1 involves creating an instance of a Ctext (constructor call #2) and then using operator= to set it to your CMessages class member(text)

The compiler reaches the end of the CMessage constructor The Ctext created from Call #2 is now destructed because it goes out of scope (it was created in the constructor)

etc...

The above covers the question asked below.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that the control went into that function that is why it was printed. Please tell me why was CText constructor called two times? Or why was it called the second time? –  Him Stud Aug 28 '12 at 18:31
    
The reason why it is called twice is: line1 in Main() constructs a CMessage. It goes into that constructor and because a CMessage contains a CText it constructs a Ctext (call #1). Now after it constructs all of the variables your CMessage will contain, it goes to your constructor code which involves making ANOTHER instance of CText (call #2) and assigning it to your class variable of the same type. In order to do this, the operator= overload is called. See edit for more detailed explanation. Im limited in the comments. –  Dean Knight Aug 29 '12 at 16:52

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