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I found that my codebase contains various data access code where I have used using statements in two different ways. Which is the better way if any and are these two methods different? Any problems that could arise from not instantiating the SqlConnection and SqlCommand in the using statement? Ignore the obvious inconsistency problem.

Method 1:

public int SampleScalar(string query, CommandType queryType, SqlParameter[] parameters)
    {
        int returnValue = 0;
        SqlConnection objConn = new SqlConnection(ConnString);
        SqlCommand objCmd = new SqlCommand(query, objConn);
        objCmd.CommandType = queryType;

        if (parameters.Length > 0)
            objCmd.Parameters.AddRange(parameters);

        using (objConn)
        {
            using (objCmd)
            {
                objConn.Open();
                try
                {
                    returnValue = (int)objCmd.ExecuteScalar();
                }
                catch (SqlException e)
                {
                    Errors.handleSqlException(e, objCmd);
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
        return returnValue;
    }

Method 2:

public int SampleScalar2(string query, CommandType queryType, SqlParameter[] parameters)
    {
        int returnValue = 0;
        using (SqlConnection objConn = new SqlConnection(ConnString))
        {
            using (SqlCommand objCmd = new SqlCommand(query, objConn))
            {
                objConn.Open();
                objCmd.CommandType = queryType;

                if (parameters.Length > 0)
                    objCmd.Parameters.AddRange(parameters);
                try
                {
                    returnValue = (int)objCmd.ExecuteScalar();
                }
                catch (SqlException e)
                {
                    Errors.handleSqlException(e, objCmd);
                    throw;
                }
            }
        }
        return returnValue;
    }
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the first snippet, if there are any exceptions that occur after the IDisposable object is created and before the start of the using, then it won't be properly disposed. With the second implementation, there is no such gap that could result in unreleased resources.

Another problem that can occur with the first approach is that you could use an object after it has been disposed, which is not likely to end well.

It's possible that you are ensuring no exception could possibly occur, and maybe you're not. In general, I would never use the first method simply because I don't trust myself (or anyone else) to never ever ever make a mistake in that unprotected space. If nothing else, I'll need to spend time and effort looking very closely to be sure that nothing can ever go wrong. You don't really gain anything from using that less-safe method either.

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Great, no advantages to the first method and obvious disadvantages. This is what I needed to know. Thanks. – Jason Eades Aug 28 '12 at 17:29

I always go with the second method. It's easier to read and understand what objects are being disposed of at the end of a given block. It will also prevent you from using an object that has been disposed.

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If you not use using you don't dispose your objets no managed, and GC no dispose

GC dispose only objects managed and sql connection is not managed so you must dispose, using use dispose in the end

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Second one is better. Please read http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx last remark.

In first object stays in scope after it's disposal. Using it then is not good practice.

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1  
SO discourages link only answers. Your answer should be useful and answer the question without needing to follow the link. – Servy Aug 28 '12 at 17:24
    
Corrected, sorry its my first time :) – Eligos Aug 28 '12 at 17:28

Per MSDN

You can instantiate the resource object and then pass the variable to the using statement, but this is not a best practice. In this case, the object remains in scope after control leaves the using block even though it will probably no longer have access to its unmanaged resources. In other words, it will no longer be fully initialized. If you try to use the object outside the using block, you risk causing an exception to be thrown. For this reason, it is generally better to instantiate the object in the using statement and limit its scope to the using block.

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