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I have a problem with an "add calculator". Valgrind reports no memory errors, no errors from compiler but the program doesn't show any output despite the printf - "Base is ".

All pointers, and variables are (n my opinion) correctly initialized.

getnum function gets a number, returns a pointer to char - char *, add function processes two numbers as strings, returns result which is a pointer to char (char *) as well.

I don't know whether the problem is memory allocation or procedures connected to processing arrays...

Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX(A,B) ((A)>(B) ? (A) : (B))

char *getnum(FILE *infile, int base)
{
    int len = 10;
    int c;
    int pos = 0;
    char *num = NULL;
    char *tmpnum = NULL;

    num = malloc(sizeof(char)*len);

    while (((c = fgetc(infile)) != EOF) && (isalnum(c))) {

        if (isdigit(c)) {
           /* irrelevant*/
        }
        else if (isalpha(c)) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Wrong base, expected 16\n");
            free(num);
            return NULL;

        }
        if (pos >= len) {
            /*realloc*/
        }
    }

    return num;           
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FILE *infile = NULL;
    char *number1 = NULL;
    char *number2 = NULL;
    char *result = NULL;
    int base, i, j = 0, length, count = 0;


    infile = fopen(argv[1], "r");

    base  = atoi(argv[2]);
    while (!feof(infile)) {
        number1 = getnum(infile, base);

        number2 = getnum(infile, base);

        break;
    }
    printf("Base is %d\n", base);
    result = add(number1, number2, base);

    length = strlen(result);
    for (i = 0; i <= length - 1; i++) {
        if (result[i] == '0') {
            count++;
        }
    }

    for (j = i; j == (length - 1); j++) {
        printf("Result is: %s\n", &result[j]);
        break;
    }
    free(result);
    result = NULL;
    fclose(infile);
    return 0;
}

Trying to work it out for the past 4 hours and can't find a mistake. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using a debugger, setting a break-point at the printf() call that you see and then step through your code? – Niklas R Aug 28 '12 at 17:41
    
What is your test input? – timrau Aug 28 '12 at 17:51
    
@timrau in input.txt I put two numbers in decimal system. Invoked the program with ./name input.txt 10 As said previously I only get Base is 10. – Peter Kowalski Aug 28 '12 at 17:55
    
@timrau Thanks to You and Matthew Slattery problem is already solved. BUT I have a question for the future: gdb informed program had run without problems. So how to use it to launch a "correctly" working code through gdb. I had only two steps from pushing start and gdb ended testing, exited normally... – Peter Kowalski Aug 28 '12 at 18:54
    
@PeterKowalski You should set a break point. Otherwise, gdb simply let the program run through. Try break main before pushing start. – timrau Aug 29 '12 at 12:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is one severe typo near the end of main().

for (j = i; j == (length - 1); j++) {
/*            ^^ SHOULD BE <= */
    printf("Result is: %s\n", &result[j]);
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Damnit, you beat me to it. – Ethan Brown Aug 28 '12 at 18:08

Looking at this code:

for (i = 0; i <= length - 1; i++) {
    if (result[i] == '0') {
        count++;
    }
}
if (count == length) {
    printf("Result is 0\n");
    free(result);
    result = NULL;                     /* arguable */
    fclose(infile);
    return 0;
}
for (i = 0; i <= length - 1; i++) {
    if (result[i] != '0') {
        break;
    }
}
for (j = i; j == (length - 1); j++) {
    printf("Result is: %s\n", &result[j]);
    break;
}
  1. Instead of counting the total number of zeroes in the output number, and then counting the number of leading zeroes again, why not combine the two?
  2. What is the last loop about? It's not even really a loop - it will execute once if i is length - 1, or not at all if not (presumably you're hitting the latter case in your test input).

e.g.

for (count = 0; count < length; count++) {
    if (result[count] != '0')
        break;
}
if (count == length) {
    printf("Result is 0\n");
    free(result);
    result = NULL;                     /* arguable */
    fclose(infile);
    return 0;
}
printf("Result is: %s\n", &result[count]);
share|improve this answer

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