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I am probably over analyzing here, but with all the reading I have done on MVC, there seem to be so many opinions on how to do things.

Is there a "Best Practices" site or document out there that defines the responsibility of each piece of MVC?

The few questions I have, keep in mind I am using the EF/Repository&UnitOfWork/Service pattern are:

1) How to get the validation results (error messages, etc) of Domain Objects and Business Rules from the Service Layer to the View Models?

2) I am using Domain Objects and a Service Layer that does all the Business Logic, then I send the Domain Objects to the controllers and let them (via AutoMapper) convert them to View Models for the views. What other types of things are the responsibility of the controller? Is the following code OK? Is this too much logic in the controller?:

public ActionResult SomeAction()
{
    var model = Mapper.Map<DomainObject, ViewModel>(service.QueryReposForData());
    model.SomeCollectionForSelectList = Mapper.Map<IEnumerable<DomainObject>, IEnumerable<ViewModel>>(service.QueryReposForSelectListData());
    return View(model);
}

I don't think that the only thing in a controller is one line that returns a view with an object graph mapped to view models?

3) I think it is OK to have properties on the ViewModels that can indicate to a view if something can be hidden for example and then perform that logic in the view? Example:

@if(Model.DisplaySomething)
{
    <div>Something to show</div>
}
else
{
    <div>Something else to show</div>
}

4) I was thinking of having my services return some sort of TransactionResult object back to the controllers on writes to make it the responsibility of the service to handle the transaction. So I would have an aggregate service that would start a transaction (UnitOfWork) do what ever it needed to do and then return this TransactionResult that could have error messages? I don't think I should make the controller responsible for managing the transaction, but rather have it just pass in a view model mapped to a domain object to the service and let it act on it?

5) Also, how much of ActionFilter's do you want to use? I know it is a huge extensibility point, but I often find myself trying to stuff all of the model creation into a filter.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just opinions here based on how we work.

We keep our Controllers so skinny they are anorexic, in almost every case.

As for ViewModels, we follow the pattern of having a ViewModel for every view. The Controller loads it up with anything it needs, and kicks it off. From there, the ViewModel drives everything. In our world, the ViewModel is tied directly to the view and contains no code that would/could be used in other parts of the application. It interacts with any part of the larger 'Model' (service layer, etc) that it needs to and packages stuff up for the View to consume.

For your #3 example, I'd say absolutely yes - it's the way we use our ViewModels.

Again, none of this is gospel - just my take on how we handle it.

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Excellent questions!

1) How to get the validation results (error messages, etc) of Domain Objects and Business Rules from the Service Layer to the View Models?

I use EntityFramework in the back-end and implement IValidatableObject both on my models and my entities. On models, I perform cross-field validation, while on entities, I perform cross-entity validations.

2) I am using Domain Objects and a Service Layer that does all the Business Logic, then I send the Domain Objects to the controllers and let them (via AutoMapper) convert them to View Models for the views. What other types of things are the responsibility of the controller? Is the following code OK? Is this too much logic in the controller?:

This code is perfect. Controllers gather data, transform data into models and feeds them into a view.

3) I think it is OK to have properties on the ViewModels that can indicate to a view if something can be hidden for example and then perform that logic in the view? Example:

Yes, this is exactly what a ViewModel is meant for. To capture all data AND logic required for your view to render.

4) I was thinking of having my services return some sort of TransactionResult object back to the controllers on writes to make it the responsibility of the service to handle the transaction. So I would have an aggregate service that would start a transaction (UnitOfWork) do what ever it needed to do and then return this TransactionResult that could have error messages? I don't think I should make the controller responsible for managing the transaction, but rather have it just pass in a view model mapped to a domain object to the service and let it act on it?

I struggled with this a bit in my projects. In the end, I moved the SaveChanges method of EntityFramework to the front-end. This allows me to build a transaction in the front-end and then commit it once. Every method in my ApiController which performs an update, create or delete will also do a SaveChanges.

I use ApiControllers as a layer of abstraction between my back-end and actual Controller classes. To elaborate, my application both uses normal Controllers (HTML) and ApiControllers (REST aka Web API). Both types of controllers share a common interface for retrieving data.

Example: http://pastebin.com/uL1NGGqH

The UnitOfWork still resides in my back-end behind a facade. I just expose the SaveChanges to the front-end. Side-effects such as ValidationExceptions are either handled by ASP.NET MVC automagically or captured in custom ActionFilters.

5) Also, how much of ActionFilter's do you want to use? I know it is a huge extensibility point, but I often find myself trying to stuff all of the model creation into a filter.

I only used a handful of ActionFilters in the large MVC project I am currently working on. These ActionFilters are mostly used to enforce security and to translate Exceptions (such as ValidationExceptions) to JSON-format so my client-side validation framework can handle it.

Off-topic: You can never over analyze. Asking yourself these fundamental questions of MVC makes you better grasp the concepts of MVC and makes you a better developer in general. Just make sure you don't do it too much in the boss' time ;)

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When you say ApiControllers, are you referring to another layer between the MVC application and the service layers? We have the same sort of thing, we call them Application Managers. They are there to manage application logic. –  Sam Aug 28 '12 at 18:35
    
"The UnitOfWork still resides in my back-end behind a facade" Could you explain this a little more for me please? –  Sam Aug 28 '12 at 18:37
1  
I've expanded my original answer a bit. Here's some info about the facade: The backend consists of a model (EntityFramework), a series of managers who operate on the model and a facade. All operations are performed using a UnitOfWork. The facade is a single class that combines all methods from all managers and acts as the "interface" for the back-end. I.e. all other components use the back-end by calling methods on the facade. The facade ALSO exposes a SaveChanges method, which internally calls SaveChanges on the UnitOfWork. –  Martin Devillers Aug 28 '12 at 19:12

Same here:

  • base controllers with common actionfilters
  • Validation is done using DataAnnotation and model validation within the controller.
  • tiny controllers with injected wrapped context or specific service layer
  • Automapper mapping ViewModels/EF Pocos.

I don't really bother about implementing UnitOfWork or explicitly using transactions since EF4 automatically creates (if it does not exist) a new transaction for all the changes done within a SaveChanges (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896325.aspx. I just have a generic interface exposing the DbSets of the Context as IQuerable and the Add/Delete/Find methods.

But as said it's all personal.

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