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In http://docs.python.org/library/struct.html, it says "<" represents little-endian mode in standard size. I checked on this website and it says the standard size is 16 bits.

WHY 16 BITS?

Is there anyway to change it to 8-bit and still using the little-endian?

Best regards!

question is still OPEN!

I know LSB or MSB describe the data organization based on bytes. The questions is the standard size is 16-bit, so python read the data based on the standard size then based on the LSB or MSB. If I use

And, if the standard size is 16-bit long, then why if I use ">h", it actually give the correct answer as the standard size is 8-bit?

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1 Answer 1

Big endian and little endian aren't really meaningful for a byte. Endianness describes the order of bytes in a multi-byte type.

That said, you can use "<B" as your type. That gives you little-endian 8 bits.

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I am going to read 32 bits in total. –  user1595754 Aug 28 '12 at 19:11
    
Then use a 32-bit type like L. –  Joe Aug 28 '12 at 19:12
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/12163549/… this is the other thread I posted. Please help if you may. –  user1595754 Aug 28 '12 at 19:12
    
I know LSB or MSB describe the data organization based on bytes. The questions is the standard size is 16-bit, so python read the data based on the standard size then based on the LSB or MSB. If I use <L, it actually read the lower 16 bits first then the upper 16 bits. However, I need to read the last 8 bits first, then read every 8-bit forward in LSB mode, to finally get a long/int data. –  user1595754 Aug 28 '12 at 19:35
    
Post your actual code and example data into the question. –  Joe Aug 28 '12 at 19:59

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