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DB2 V9 Z/Os

CREATE PROCEDURE SERDB.I21MMSNOUPD () 
RESULT SETS 1
LANGUAGE SQL
FENCED
COLLID SER
WLM ENVIRONMENT DDSNSPENV
RUN OPTIONS 'NOTEST(NONE,*,*,*)'

P1: BEGIN

--Declare variables
DECLARE CONSUMER        INTEGER;
DECLARE NEW_MMS_NO      INTEGER;
DECLARE END_TABLE       INT DEFAULT 0;


DECLARE C1 CURSOR FOR 
SELECT I20_CONSUMER_ID,
       NEW_MMS_NO
  FROM SERDB.I20_TEMP
-- WHERE I20_CONSUMER_ID = 164921;
ORDER BY I20_CONSUMER_ID;

DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND
 SET END_TABLE = 1;  

OPEN C1;
FETCH C1 INTO CONSUMER,
          NEW_MMS_NO;

WHILE END_TABLE = 0 DO              

UPDATE SERDB.I20_CONSUMER_T
   SET I20_MMS_NO = NEW_MMS_NO
 WHERE I20_CONSUMER_ID = CONSUMER;

END WHILE;

CLOSE C1;              
END P1

The above stored procedure builds with a cond code 0, but fails to execute even when a specific consumer_id. Does anyone see something wrong?

Individual sql statements run exactly as they're supposed to.

I've followed the examples for Cursors in SQL Procedures from IBM.

Thank you

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1  
You know this could (probably) be done better without the cursor, right? Namely, this can be done in a single UPDATE statement, assuming the size of the updated rows isn't too large (for the transaction). Prefer 'normal' statements over cursors most of the time, unless the result set is either paged (as when displaying to a user), or the update/delete/whatever needs to be 'batched' (if the count of rows locked would be too large). –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 29 '12 at 15:19
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1 Answer

I agree 100% with @X-Zero, this seems like a huge amount of work defining cursors and what-not, when you could do a simple set-based operation (likely with better performance). Here are two examples of how you can do it with a single operation:

Normal UPDATE:

UPDATE SESSION.I20_CONSUMER_T A
SET I20_MMS_NO = (
    SELECT NEW_MMS_NO
    FROM SESSION.I20_TEMP B
    WHERE A.I20_CONSUMER_ID = B.CONSUMER
)
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT 1
    FROM SESSION.I20_TEMP C
    WHERE A.I20_CONSUMER_ID = C.CONSUMER
)

New MERGE hotness:

MERGE INTO SESSION.I20_CONSUMER_T AS T
USING SESSION.I20_TEMP AS M
   ON T.I20_CONSUMER_ID = M.CONSUMER
WHEN MATCHED THEN
    UPDATE SET T.I20_MMS_NO = M.NEW_MMS_NO
ELSE IGNORE

These were tested on DB2 for Linux/Unix/Windows v9.7, but should work on any version of DB2 newer than 9.1 (DB2 for iSeries is a wildcard, I never remember what that platform does or doesn't support :) )

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My iSeries doesn't support MERGE, but the first one should work fine (Which was exactly what I was thinking of). –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 30 '12 at 15:40
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