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How do I get a directory size (files in the directory) in C#?

In vbscript, it's incredibly simple to get the folder size in GB or MB:

Set oFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Dim fSize = CInt((oFSO.GetFolder(path).Size / 1024) / 1024)
WScript.Echo fSize

In C#, with all my searches, all I can come up with are long, convoluted, recursive searches for every file size in all subfolders, then add them all up at the end.

Is there no other way?

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marked as duplicate by Cᴏʀʏ, dtb, Tim Schmelter, ρяσѕρєя K, Donal Fellows Aug 29 '12 at 8:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
VBScript and C# run on different environments, you know. Maybe the easiest way is to run a VBScript from your app. Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/200422/… – Andre Calil Aug 28 '12 at 19:44
    
@AndreCalil: No; that is not the easiest way. – SLaks Aug 28 '12 at 19:45
    
@SLaks Could you point what would be an easier way? I don't know of any builtin solution besides the sum of the files. – Andre Calil Aug 28 '12 at 19:47
up vote 19 down vote accepted

How about this:

private static long GetDirectorySize(string folderPath)
{
    DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(folderPath);
    return di.EnumerateFiles("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Sum(fi => fi.Length);
}

from here.

This will give you the size in bytes; you will have to "prettify" that into GBs or MBs.

NOTE: This only works in .NET 4+.

EDIT: Changed the wildcard search from "*.*" to "*" as per the comments in the thread to which I linked. This should extend its usability to other OSes (if using Mono, for example).

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It's too small an edit for me to get it through but I think you meant to put .Sum(di => di.Length); – Spacemancraig Aug 28 '12 at 19:49
    
+1 Sincerly, I prefer this to my solution. – fuex Aug 28 '12 at 20:21
3  
@Spacemancraig: No, fi should be correct, because we are naming each FileInfo object enumerated by di.EnumerateFiles(). – Cᴏʀʏ Aug 28 '12 at 20:22
    
That "prettify" can be found here stackoverflow.com/questions/14488796/… – prabhakaran Mar 12 '14 at 10:20

You can also use recursion to get all subdirectories and sum the sizes:

public static long GetDirectorySize(string path){
    string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(path);
    string[] subdirectories = Directory.GetDirectories(path);

    long size = files.Sum(x => new FileInfo(x).Length);
    foreach(string s in subdirectories)  
        size += GetDirectorySize(s);

    return size;
}
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1  
Correct but "In C#, with all my searches, all I can come up with are long, convoluted, recursive searches for every file size in all subfolders, then add them all up at the end." – L.B Aug 28 '12 at 20:29

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