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I am using EF/Repository/Unit of Work, but I am having a hard time understanding some details. Inside the UnitOfWork, I create a new EF DbContext (EmmaContext), but look at inside the repository, I cast it which I know is wrong, how do I get the context inside the repo correctly? Maybe I am totally on the wrong path?

Here is my UnitOfWork:

//Interface
public interface IUnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
    void Commit();
}

//Implementation
public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    #region Fields/Properties
    private bool isDisposed = false;
    public EmmaContext Context { get; set; }
    #endregion

    #region Constructor(s)
    public UnitOfWork()
    {
        this.Context = new EmmaContext();
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods
    public void Commit()
    {
        this.Context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!isDisposed)
            Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        isDisposed = true;
        if (disposing)
        {
            if (this.Context != null)
                this.Context.Dispose();
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

Here is the repository:

//Interface
public interface IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    IQueryable<TEntity> Query();
    void Add(TEntity entity);
    void Attach(TEntity entity);
    void Delete(TEntity entity);
    void Save(TEntity entity);
}

//Implementation
public abstract class RepositoryBase<TEntity> : IRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    #region Fields/Properties
    protected EmmaContext context;
    protected DbSet<TEntity> dbSet;
    #endregion

    #region Constructor(s)
    public RepositoryBase(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    {
        this.context = ((UnitOfWork)unitOfWork).Context;
        this.dbSet = context.Set<TEntity>();
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods
    public void Add(TEntity entity)
    {
        dbSet.Add(entity);
    }

    public void Attach(TEntity entity)
    {
        dbSet.Attach(entity);
    }

    public void Delete(TEntity entity)
    {
        dbSet.Remove(entity);
    }

    public IQueryable<TEntity> Query()
    {
        return dbSet.AsQueryable();
    }

    public void Save(TEntity entity)
    {
        Attach(entity);
        context.MarkModified(entity);
    }
    #endregion
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sam: I usually feel comfortable with a concrete Repository taking a concrete UnitOfWork in the ctor:

   public RepositoryBase(UnitOfWork unitOfWork)
   {
        this.context = unitOfWork.Context;
        this.dbSet = context.Set<TEntity>();
   }

The repository and UoW typically work in concert and need to know a little bit about each other.

Of course the code consuming these classes only know about the interface definitions and not the concrete types.

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically what I have done, added a IUnitOfWork interface, but as far as unit testing what do you think? Are you really going to unit test your repositories and unit of work? –  Sam Aug 29 '12 at 2:11
    
After thinking a little bit, I was wondering how you abstract away the implementation to the calling code and still get the context into the repo from a IoC container? Do you have a code sample? Thanks! BTW - I just read your MVC 3.0 book, great book! –  Sam Aug 29 '12 at 2:34
    
@Sam - thanks :) –  OdeToCode Aug 29 '12 at 12:07
2  
@Sam - A controller or other component in the system would work just with interface definitions like IUnitOfWork. Only your container would know that IUnitOfWork maps to UnitOfWork and that is typically configured into the container, i.e. with StructureMap you typically have a piece of startup code that says x.For<IUnitOfWork>().Use<UnitOfWork(). As for testing - would test the real UoW and repositories using integration tests instead of unit tests. Hope that makes some sense. –  OdeToCode Aug 29 '12 at 12:09
    
Perfect! Thanks again! –  Sam Aug 29 '12 at 23:28

Unit of Work
Repository

UnitOfWork is for managing atomic operations.

Repository encapsulates the set of objects persisted in a data store and the operations performed over them.

If you pass the context or UnitOfWork, than you do not implement UnitOfWork+Repository pattern, cause you pulling out from UnitOfWork its responsibility. Aka you do not need it .

Right implementation if you only pass DbSet. Actually you do not need more.

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This is the best article I've read.

In their example, they manage the repositories like this:

    private SchoolContext context = new SchoolContext();
    private GenericRepository<Department> departmentRepository;
    private GenericRepository<Course> courseRepository;

    public GenericRepository<Department> DepartmentRepository
    {
        get
        {

            if (this.departmentRepository == null)
            {
                this.departmentRepository = new GenericRepository<Department>(context);
            }
            return departmentRepository;
        }
    }

Your unit of work holds the context, and if it needs to reference a repository, it creates it if it has not been created, and passes in the context that it's holding.

The article also walks through how they converted a regular MVC controller implementation into using the unit of work pattern.

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Great article! Thanks for the link. –  Ben Black Dec 14 '12 at 19:54
7  
Bad article! They Do create the context and repositories inside the unitofwork class instead of injecting both with a di Tool. –  Elisa Feb 23 '13 at 9:17

In this post says that you have to implement IUnitOfWork interface in your repository base.

I hope this helps. Regards

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