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See questions in the comments of the code.

I have two classes.

Here's the main class (class 1):

//this class contains controls on the form.
Class MyApp
{
    private void btnProcessImages_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        /* if an error occurs in the method below, I want to: 
               1. Show the error message, and
               2. Based on fail or success do different actions.
        */
        Calculate.DevideNumbers(2, 0);
    }

    /* 
       if the above is successful, I want to do 1 thing, 
       if not, i want to do something else (with controls on THIS form).
    */ 

}

And here's the second class:

Class Calculate
{
     public double void DivideNumbers(int num1, int num2)
     {
           double result = 0.00;

           try
           {
                result = num1/num2;
                return result;
           }
           catch (Exception)
           {
                throw;
           }  
     }
}

My question is: What is the best way for DivideNumbers() to report an error back to the calling method?

The caller needs to know if there was an error and what the error message was. How would I go about sending the calling method these two pieces of information?

share|improve this question
    
should class DoSomething be called Calculate and method Calculate named DevideNumbers? –  Claudio Redi Aug 28 '12 at 21:26
    
Please clarify your answer, separating question and code. Also, you're returning a int in a void method. –  Andre Aug 28 '12 at 21:26
    
I updated everything. –  Testifier Aug 28 '12 at 21:27
    
You'd usually want the caller to deal with the exception, unless the calculate method actually handles the exception. –  C.Evenhuis Aug 28 '12 at 21:27
    
@C.Evenhuis, right. But how does the caller actually "catch" that error? I need to display the error message in a message box for example. How would the caller get the error message from the catch block of the other method? –  Testifier Aug 28 '12 at 21:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remove the try catch in DivideNumbers and let the exception bubble up.

Then Wrap the call to Calculate.DevideNumbers(2, 0); in a try catch block.

//this class contains controls on the form.
Class MyApp
{
    private void btnProcessImages_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
      try
      {
          Calculate.DevideNumbers(2, 0);
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
           DoStuff();
           Return();
      }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but isn't that over killing it if im already using a try catch in the method ? –  Testifier Aug 28 '12 at 21:26
    
You could also return true or false from the internal method and check that value to determine an error. Both ways will work fine. –  Chris Kooken Aug 28 '12 at 21:28
    
@Testifier : You will be able to remove the try/catch from DivideNumbers, and let the exception bubble up. Unless you really need to handle in the inner method. –  Andre Aug 28 '12 at 21:29

Remove the try catch in your DevideNumbers method, I has no use there because you don't to anything in the catch. Is better to place your try catch int the btnProcessImages_Click method and there you can add the error handling.

share|improve this answer
    
this was pretty much the answer I was looking for. :) Thanks Erwin! –  Testifier Aug 28 '12 at 21:30

You can do:

class MyApp : Form
{
    //...

    bool erroroccurs = false;
    private void btnProcessImages_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
          try
          {
              Calculate.DevideNumbers(2, 0);
          }
          catch(Exception ex)
          {
              MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
              erroroccurs = true;
          }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
but what if I want to show the error in the Main class? –  Testifier Aug 28 '12 at 21:28

First, you should not add a try catch block on DevideNumbers since, according the code you provided, you're doing nothing with the exception. You only need to catch exceptions in case you plan to do something with it (log the error for instance)

The exception will bubble up anyway so you don't need that try catch block

On the caller method you could catch any exception when calling DevideNumbers and do your magic.

share|improve this answer

Here's my recommendation. Note a few things I changed that aren't extremely obvious.

  • DivideNumbers returns a double (you had it returning a value, but the method was marked as void.
  • I cast one int to a double in DivideNumbers. An int divided by an int is always an int. This can produce unexpected results, unless you want/expect implicit rounding.
  • Exception handling is done in a different class, since it seems that's where you want to handle it. I.E. what's the point of catching an exception if your only intent is to re-throw it? Just let it bubble up.

...

Class MyApp
{
    private void btnProcessImages_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try 
        {
            double result = Calculate.DevideNumbers(2, 0);
            HandleSuccess(result);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            HandleError(ex.Message);
        }
    }

    private void HandleSuccess(double result)
    {
        // Do whatever you do when no errors occur
    }

    private void HandleError(string errorMessage)
    {
        // Do whatever you do when an error occurs... log the exception, etc.
    }
}

...

Class Calculate
{
    public static double DivideNumbers(int num1, int num2)
    {
        result = (double)num1/num2;
        return result;

        // There's no need to catch an exception here if you're ONLY going to re-throw it.
    }        
}
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