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I have the following code:

myHist <- hist(myData)

With this I can run:

myHist$breaks
myHist$intensities

To see all my breaks and intensities, but I'm wondering if there is a way to see the intensity for a specific break? For example say the above outputs the following:

[1] 0 1 2

and

[1] 0.258 0.068 0.114

How could I get the intensity for 2?

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2  
myHist$intensities[myHist$breaks == 2] maybe? I'm not sure I understand. –  joran Aug 28 '12 at 21:31
    
Yep, that is it. If you put that as an answer I will accept. –  Abe Miessler Aug 28 '12 at 21:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the [ operator to subset your results. Illustrating using iris:

x <- hist(iris$Sepal.Length)

str(x)
List of 7
 $ breaks     : num [1:9] 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 8
 $ counts     : int [1:8] 5 27 27 30 31 18 6 6
 $ intensities: num [1:8] 0.0667 0.36 0.36 0.4 0.4133 ...
 $ density    : num [1:8] 0.0667 0.36 0.36 0.4 0.4133 ...
 $ mids       : num [1:8] 4.25 4.75 5.25 5.75 6.25 6.75 7.25 7.75
 $ xname      : chr "iris$Sepal.Length"
 $ equidist   : logi TRUE
 - attr(*, "class")= chr "histogram"

Now extract the data for the second bin:

x$breaks[2:3]
[1] 4.5 5.0

x$intensities[2]
[1] 0.36

or equivalently, to select an intensity corresponding to a particular break, you might do:

x$intensities[x$breaks == 4.5]
[1] 0.36

Note that there is always one more break than bins, i.e. the breaks indicate the range around each bin.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess what I am wondering is if it is possible to get the intensity for 4.5 not index 2. I understand that these are the same value, but lets say I know all of the breaks before hand and I want to get the specific intensity for a given break. –  Abe Miessler Aug 28 '12 at 21:49
    
@AbeMiessler I just added it to Andrie's answer, as it's only marginally different from what he did. Trying to avoid clutter. Go ahead and accept his answer... –  joran Aug 28 '12 at 22:05

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