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My code to set a global variable using eval is not working. It's as if the assignment is not called at all, but no script errors occur.

<script type="text/javascript">

    $(function() {

        setTimeout(function() {
            eval('var x = 1;');
            alert(x);
        }, 0);
    });
</script>

<div onclick="alert(x);">Click to see 'x'</div>

When the page loads, the alert shows what I expect; it confirms that x = 1. But after that, I click on the div and get a javascript error that x is undefined. How do I make eval add this variable properly?

Background: The code above is a minimally reproducing example from a project I'm working on where we must execute javascript code during AJAX responses. eval works properly most of the time, but this is causing problems.

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1  
Why don't you use window.x = 1; instead? –  zerkms Aug 28 '12 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Eval runs locally, you're setting a local variable.

To set a global variable, remove var;

<script type="text/javascript">

    $(function() {

        setTimeout(function() {
            eval('x = 1;');
            alert(x);
        }, 0);
    });
</script>
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1  
At that point why use eval at all? –  asawyer Aug 28 '12 at 21:32
1  
@asawyer I don't really care. I'm just answering the question. This is the reason the OP's code isn't working –  Juan Mendes Aug 28 '12 at 21:33
    
@asawyer: it's a common way of natural code obfuscation. Some people use some special obfuscating software, another - just hire bad developers. –  zerkms Aug 28 '12 at 21:34
    
As I wrote in the question, the evaluated code is javascript to be run when an ajax request completes. The script is generated by the server. But this is correct - the problem was that the javascript was wrong, not the ajax processing. My javascript sense is not good enough to have caught this; thanks. –  tenfour Aug 28 '12 at 21:35

I wouldn't recommend setting global variables, but if you absolutely have to, use the window object:

window['x'] = 1;
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you can even use window.x = 1; –  gdoron Aug 28 '12 at 21:33
    
The javascript is generated by server controls; it's out of my control. –  tenfour Aug 28 '12 at 21:33
2  
So what is your question then? –  Blender Aug 28 '12 at 21:33
    
@tenfour: then file a bug to the server controls' team bug tracker –  zerkms Aug 28 '12 at 21:34
2  
@JuanMendes: The point of the question is to help tenfour fix the problem, not cover it with duct tape. I have yet to see any circumstance where the server has to set JavaScript variables like this. –  Blender Aug 28 '12 at 21:39

You could use window.eval() to run eval() from global scope. This will assign var as a variable of window, which is what a global variable is: a variable attached to window.

... But you really really shouldn't. eval() is sandboxed for a reason.

That is not unless you really know what you are doing and trust everything you are receiving through XMLHttpRequest. It is one of those chicken/egg things: if you trust the code enough to execute it, it should be programmed well enough to prefix global variables with window. to begin with; thus, you should not need to use window.eval().

Besides, unless you are just trying to avoid async headaches by using the more-manageable XMLHttpRequest (there's a first time for everything...), you really should just create a script tag, assign it's source, and append it as a child to the head or body tag. Dynamically appending script tags is even faster than using XHR, especially for big scripts.

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