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Instead of this:

FILE = open(f)
do_something(FILE)
FILE.close()

it's better to use this:

with open(f) as FILE:
    do_something(FILE)

What if I have something like this?

if f is not None:
   FILE = open(f)
else:
   FILE = None
do_something(FILE)
if FILE is not None:
    FILE.close()

Where do_something also has an "if FILE is None" clause, and still does something useful in that case - I don't want to just skip do_something if FILE is None.

Is there a sensible way of converting this to with/as form? Or am I just trying to solve the optional file problem in a wrong way?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you were to just write it like this:

if f is not None:
    with open(f) as FILE:
        do_something(FILE)
else:
    do_something(f)

(file is a builtin btw )

Update

Here is a funky way to do an on-the-fly context with an optional None that won't crash:

from contextlib import contextmanager

none_context = contextmanager(lambda: iter([None]))()
# <contextlib.GeneratorContextManager at 0x1021a0110>

with (open(f) if f is not None else none_context) as FILE:
    do_something(FILE)

It creates a context that returns a None value. The with will either produce FILE as a file object, or a None type. But the None type will have a proper __exit__

share|improve this answer
    
+1, beat me to it. – sberry Aug 28 '12 at 22:14
    
@sberry - I saw that we almost had the same thing, really close to eachother :-) – jdi Aug 28 '12 at 22:14
    
(btw, good catch on the file builtin, fixed) – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:28
    
I was hoping to avoid repeating do_something, since it's a bigger chunk of code in the real case (though I can stick it in a function, etc). But maybe this is the best I can do. – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:35
1  
Also, it fails if an exception is raised (AttributeError: 'listiterator' object has no attribute 'throw'). This is more robust: def none_context(a=None): return contextmanager(lambda: (x for x in [a]))() – ecatmur Apr 18 '13 at 16:48

This seems to solve all of your concerns.

if file_name is not None:
    with open(file_name) as fh:
        do_something(fh)
else:
        do_something(None)
share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping to avoid repeating do_something, since it's a bigger chunk of code in the real case (though I can stick it in a function, etc). But maybe this is the best I can do. – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:34

something like:

if file:      #it checks for None,false values no need of "if file is None"
    with open(file) as FILE:
        do_something(FILE)
else:
    FILE=None
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I didn't make myself very clear. Hopefully the edited version of the question makes more sense. I actually want do_something to run even if FILE is None - it has other useful functionality, the file-related section of it is optional. – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:19

While all of the other answers are excellent, and preferable, note that the with expression may be any expression, so you can do:

with (open(file) if file is not None else None) as FILE:
    pass

Note that if the else clause were evaluated, to yield None this would result in an exception, because NoneType does not support the appropriate operations to be used as a context manager.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, awesome! I didn't realize that. Looks like this is what I need. – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:20
3  
Wait...are you sure this works? None type would crash because it does not have an AttributeError: __exit__ – jdi Aug 28 '12 at 22:22
    
@jdi - damn, you're right, it does crash... Back to the drawing board. :( – weronika Aug 28 '12 at 22:25
1  
@jdi: Fair point. I want to emphasise the syntax and possibilities here, though. I'll edit to make clear that this would fail on execution. – Marcin Aug 28 '12 at 23:11
1  
@Marcin: I ended up coming up with an on-the-fly NoneType context, that works the way you were intending with this, in my answer. – jdi Aug 28 '12 at 23:12

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