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In the following code block, why do I need to declare myData in the class, then initialize myData = new string[size] in the constructor? Why is it illegal to code private string[] myData = new string[size] ?

That is, why do I need to do:

class IntIndexer
{
    private string[] myData;

    public IntIndexer(int size)
    {
        myData = new string[size];

        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            myData[i] = "empty";
        }
    }
}

Instead of

class IntIndexer
{
    private string[] myData = new string[size];

    public IntIndexer(int size)
    {    
        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            myData[i] = "empty";
        }
    }
}
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1  
Can you clarify the question? Are you asking why member variables must be declared outside the scope of a function, or are you finding that your constructor isn't working as expected? –  Rowland Shaw Aug 1 '09 at 15:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Because the variable "size" only exists in the constructor.

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2  
This basically answers the question but ShuggyCoUk's answer is better because it explains why 'size' will not always be known. –  weiqure Aug 1 '09 at 16:45

Because you do not know what size will be, or even if it exists outside the constructor.

Inline initialisers run as part of all constructors in the class. Adding another constructor without size would break your class if this were implemented, a confusing state of affairs.

Also even if the compiler were made smart enough to check for all this it would be a confusing abuse of scope. What if there were a constant field called size somewhere else in the class?

All these are reasons to not attempt to allow this sort of thing and there are precious little benefits to it so why bother.

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Because size is only known to the constructor at run-time - not compile-time. If you wanted to size myData to a constant size - i.e. known at compile-time, then you could do it in the declaration:

private string[] myData = new string[1000];

or

private const int DATA_SIZE = 1000;

private string[] myData = new string[DATA_SIZE];
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Because size is a parameter of the constructor and only exists within the scope of the constructor.

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The issue here is one of scope. You can't reference size, a parameter of the constructor, outside the constructor because it isn't defined outside the constructor. This will give you a compile error. If the variable were defined in the object, it would be perfectly legal, but you'd be dependent on the order of initialization as to whether you would get the effect you intended. If the initializer for the variable were run before the initializer for the array, then it might work. IMO, you're better off doing the initialization in the constructor because that way you define the order of execution and know what will happen, when.

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Because you don't know the size until the constructor is called. The following field definition is fine:

private string[] myData = new string[100];
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you cannot do that for one reason: How would the compiler know how big size is at compile time?

if you want to initialise an array with a runtime-variable size, you must initialise it within a runtime method when the variable has a value!

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1  
Umm. All arrays are initialized at runtime, even if you specify a constant. It would be perfectly legal to use a variable (scoped to the object, not the constructor), though it wouldn't have the intended effect unless the variable were initialized prior to the array being initialized. –  tvanfosson Aug 1 '09 at 16:03
    
ahem. yes, badly worded, initialising an array at runtime wouldn't make sense, however the explanation is sound otherwise =] –  Ed Woodcock Aug 1 '09 at 16:21
    
@ tvanfosson It is perfectly legal for the compiler to be changed such that arrays of structs (probably just primitives) of a const size are backed into the dll's in the same way constant strings are - just food for thought... –  ShuggyCoUk Aug 1 '09 at 22:38
    
damn my spellings bad - bedtime. that should be "Baked" –  ShuggyCoUk Aug 1 '09 at 23:11

Because if you try to do in this way

class IntIndexer

{

private string[] myData = new string[size];

public IntIndexer(int size)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        myData[i] = "empty";
    }
}

}

you will get compilation error The name 'size' does not exist in the current context.

beacuse at this point private string[] myData = new string[size]; size is not yet declared.

And if you will write in this way from where you will get the value of size as your objective i think will be to make it flexible and let the instance do that for you that's why your objective can be done by this

class IntIndexer { private string[] myData;

public IntIndexer(int size)
{
    myData = new string[size];

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        myData[i] = "empty";
    }
}

}

ie you will be setting that size like this

IntIndexer instance = new IntIndexer(100);

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