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Since most of the ppl like puzzles I,ll start this question with a (bad spelling :))gotw like introduction, note that if you dont care about it you can skip the warmup(JG question) and read the G question since that is my "real SO question".

During review of the code samples provided by potential new employees you stumbled upon a linked list whose implementation uses modern C++11 feature, an std::unique_ptr<>.

template <typename T> 
struct Node { 
   T data; 
   std::unique_ptr<Node<T>> next; 
   Node () {} 
   Node(const T& data_): data(data_) {} 
   Node(Node& other) { std::static_assert(false,"OH NOES"); } 
   Node& operator= (const Node& other) { 
     std::static_assert(false,"OH NOES"); 
     return *new Node(); 
   } 
public: 
   void addNext(const T& t) { 
      next.reset(new Node<T>(t)); 
   }
};

template<typename T>
class FwdList
{
    std::unique_ptr<Node<T>> head;
public:
    void add(const T& t)
    {
        if (head == nullptr)
            head.reset( new Node<T>(t));
        else {
            Node<T>* curr_node = head.get();
            while (curr_node->next!=nullptr) {
                curr_node = curr_node->next.get();
            }
            curr_node->addNext(t);
        }
    }
    void clear() {
        head.reset(); 
    }
 };

JG question:

Determine(ignoring the missing functionality) problem(s) with this code.

G question: (added 2. based on answers)
1.

Is there a way to fix the problem(s) detected in JG part of the question without the use of raw pointers?

2.

Does the fix work for the containers where node contain more than one pointer(for example binary tree has pointers to left and right child)

Answers:
JG :

stackoverflow :). Reason:recursion of the unique_ptr<> destructors triggered by .clear() function.

G:

(???) I have no idea, my gut feeling is no, but I would like to check with the experts.

So long story short: is there a way to use smart pointers in node based structures and not end up with SO problems? Please don't say that trees probably wont get too deep, or something like that, im looking for general solution.

share|improve this question
    
Without providing the definition of the Node<T> the question makes no sense. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 29 '12 at 2:40
    
template <typename T> struct Node { T data; std::unique_ptr<Node<T>> next; Node () {} Node(const T& data_): data(data_) { } Node(Node& other) { std::static_assert(false,"OH NOES"); } Node& operator= (const Node& other) { std::static_assert(false,"OH NOES"); return *new Node(); } public: void addNext(const T& t) { next.reset(new Node<T>(t)); } }; –  NoSenseEtAl Aug 29 '12 at 6:48
    
I have added the code to the question. +1 for copying and pasting (it avoids issues during the manual typing of the same code), but for the next time, consider changing tabs for blocks of spaces as that will make it easier to edit here. The next thing is that it is not clear what you want: do you want to remove a single node or do you want to clear the list? (Side note: If you store a pointer to the last node in the list, then you will not need to walk it over with each addNode; delete the copy and assignment from Node if you don't want them: Node& operator=(const Node&)=delete;) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 29 '12 at 12:08
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas - list functionality isnt what I was curious about... all I cared about was the SO caused by recursive calls to ~unique_ptr<T>(), and ofc how to fix it. –  NoSenseEtAl Aug 29 '12 at 13:16
    
How many entries did you have in the list? How much memory do you have allocated for the stack (in linux you can test this with ulimit)? For the case of balanced binary trees that you mention in a comment: the maximum depth (i.e. number of recursive calls) is log(N) so you will need a huge amount of elements to trigger a SO. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 29 '12 at 13:23

1 Answer 1

You can clear it iteratively, making sure that each node's next pointer is empty before destroying the node:

while (head) {
    head = std::move(head->next);
}

A binary tree is trickier; but you can flatten it into a list by iteratively cutting off right-hand branches and adding them to the bottom left, something like this:

node * find_bottom_left(node * head) {
    while (head && head->left) {
        head = head->left.get();
    }
    return head;
}

node * bottom = find_bottom_left(head.get());

while (head) {
    bottom->left = std::move(head->right);
    bottom = find_bottom_left(bottom);
    head = std::move(head->left);
}
share|improve this answer
    
does = call deleter on old content of the head? If yes really awesome and elegant solution. :) –  NoSenseEtAl Aug 28 '12 at 23:30
    
@NoSenseEtAl: Yes, reassigning a (non-null) unique_ptr deletes the old target. –  Mike Seymour Aug 28 '12 at 23:31
    
cool, but am I right to assert that this works only for linked lists, for example binary tree is unfixable because it has 2 pointers to left and right child ? Or maybe it could be done (maybe even without custom destructor )? –  NoSenseEtAl Aug 28 '12 at 23:35
    
@NoSenseEtAl: It's certainly possible; I've sketched one way of doing it. (Disclaimer: it's after midnight, and my brain is shutting down for the night, so it may well be wrong.) –  Mike Seymour Aug 28 '12 at 23:55
    
tnx, will check it after work. –  NoSenseEtAl Aug 29 '12 at 7:59

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