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My understanding is based on this long, but fantastic, article which supports the behavior listed in the C# specification.

The CLI standard (EMCA-335) shows that if there is no suitable catch, the runtime should terminate immediately. The .NET runtime does not do this, instead it seems to lean toward the behavior of the C# specification (EMCA-334).

First, I find it strange that a language specification is appears to be defining framework behavior. Secondly, They seem to contradict.

  • Do they contradict each other, or am I getting the wrong meaning of the document?
  • Does a runtime have to go about exception handling in this way to be compliant with the standard?

As an optional question, which one is the "correct" one, as in, if I were to write my own implementation of the CLI which one should I use? Note that EMCA-335 (CLI) document was updated two months ago, where EMCA-334 (C#) was updated back in 2006.


ECMA-335 Partition I Section 12.4.2.5

  • When an exception occurs, the CLI searches the array for the first protected block that
    • Protects a region including the current instruction pointer and
    • Is a catch handler block and
    • Whose filter wishes to handle the exception
  • If a match is not found in the current method, the calling method is searched, and so on. If no match is found the CLI will dump a stack trace and abort the program.

  • If a match is found, the CLI walks the stack back to the point just located, but this time calling the finally and fault handlers. It then starts the corresponding exception handler.

C# Specification §15.9.5 and §15.10 (§8.9.5 and §8.10 on MSDN)

The main difference between it and the CLI standard, is that whether or not a catch block is found, the application will not just exist, but will still unwind the stack, and take care of finally handlers.

I would suggest reading the standard itself to get a better meaning of this, since below is a very crude summary. It outlines step-by-step how a try statement is executed with each possible scenario.

  • In the function that raises the exception:
    • Looks for a matching catch clause in each try statement
      • Executes the catch statement if it exists
    • A finally block is executed if it exists
  • If there was no handler, the above steps are repeated in the calling function
  • If the exception processing terminates all function member invocations in the current thread, indicating that the thread has no handler for the exception, then the thread is itself terminated. The impact of such termination is implementation-defined.
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3  
+1 for not just thoroughly reading one specification, but two! Interesting question too :) –  Simon Whitehead Aug 28 '12 at 23:13
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If the thread is terminated (or abort the program), the exception is not propagated out of the try statement and there is no control leaving a try statement--the thread simply ends control. I don't think there is a contradiction. –  Peter Ritchie Aug 28 '12 at 23:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this might just be a matter of a vague wording.

If a match is not found in the current method, the calling method is searched, and so on. If no match is found the CLI will dump a stack trace and abort the program.

Okay, that's true in C#. We all know that if we don't have a catch then an exception will bring down our program.

If a match is found, the CLI walks the stack back to the point just located, but this time calling the finally and fault handlers. It then starts the corresponding exception handler.

And that matches what we know from C# too. If there are some finally (we don't get to see fault) blocks to deal with as we go up the stack from the exception being thrown until our catch block, they get processed, but it stops there and goes no further up the stack.

A lot hangs on how we read the "If" that starts that second excerpt I just quoted. You're reading it as "if ... then ... otherwise no such thing". It could be read though as the first excerpt identifying the point in the stack that will be walked to: If there was a catch, then it's walked to that point. If there is no catch, then it's walked to the very top of the stack and we get a dump and abort. The finally handlers (and fault handlers) still get called, but the point is not that of a matching catch handler.

Your reading is the most literal, and mine the one that stretches things a bit. However, mine does match with the description of finally elsewhere in the same standard, most closely

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Turns out this is correct, it is vague wording. I was reading in the most literal sense, which is clearly not the behavior. However, it seems that the standard (rightly) relies on people reading the whole section. I.12.4.2 says that finally handler will occur regardless if it's normal or an unhandled exception. Not at all implementation-defined as, the CLI standard requires the behavior listed in the C# spec. I should have read the whole section. Don't I feel sheepish now? :X –  Christopher Currens Aug 30 '12 at 6:02
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@ChristopherCurrens No need to feel sheepish. I'd still consider the wording you point to, to be flawed. It should be clearer at that point. Have you suggested an errata? –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 8:43
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I hadn't even though of suggesting one. Perhaps it should be done by someone. I wouldn't know how to submit it...though I guess I could actually look for it. –  Christopher Currens Aug 30 '12 at 20:49

There's no conflict here. The C# language specification is worded like this:

If the try statement has no catch clauses or if no catch clause matches the exception:
• If the try statement has a finally block, the finally block is executed.
• The exception is propagated to the next enclosing try statement.

Bullet 2 here specially doesn't say what happens when there is no next enclosing try statement. For that, turn to the end of 8.9.5:

If the exception processing terminates all function member invocations in the current thread, indicating that the thread has no handler for the exception, then the thread is itself terminated. The impact of such termination is implementation-defined.

It certainly is implementation-defined. Beyond the Ecma 335 spec, the exception handling policy is a configurable item in the Microsoft CLR. Controlled by ICLRPolicyManager::SetActionOnFailure(). In turn configurable in the default host with the <legacyUnhandledExceptionPolicy> app.exe.config file element. The default for CLR version 2.0 and up is to immediately terminate the program.

This is otherwise fairly unproductive biblical hermeneutics. None of this should come as a surprise to a C# programmer, especially given how easy it is to test.

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Actually, bullet 2 is explained in section 8.9.5. It outlines in detail exception propagation and what should happen. It explains that after the exception is propagated (it references the execution listing of the try statement from 8.10) that the thread would be terminated. –  Christopher Currens Aug 29 '12 at 0:22
    
The C# spec also includes "If the search for matching catch clauses reaches the code that initially started the thread, then execution of the thread is terminated. The impact of such termination is implementation-defined"... –  Peter Ritchie Aug 29 '12 at 0:23

The cited article in the O.P. has an incorrect underlying assumption:

Of course, we can’t talk about managed exceptions without first considering Windows Structured Exception Handling (SEH). And we also need to look at the C++ exception model. That’s because both managed exceptions and C++ exceptions are implemented on top of the underlying SEH mechanism, and because managed exceptions must interoperate with both SEH and C++ exceptions.

The CLR standard (ISO 23271/ECMA 335) is intentionally platform-agnostic. Microsoft's implementation is one of many possible implementations (Mono, of course, being another).

Interoperability with Windows Structured Exception Handling and C++ exception handling is, I'm pretty sure, Microsoft's choice and not an ISO 23271 requirement.

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I don't think that's an incorrect assumption so much as an appropriate focus, for an article that is about a particular implementation. –  Jon Hanna Jun 20 at 9:35

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