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I wrote this line of code to handle nulls but I still get an "Object reference not set to an instance of an object" error whenever I run this line of code when expectedItem is null. What gives? What's the proper way to write this? Since expectedItem is null, I'd expect expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount to be null also so this statement should assign an empty string to x.

string x = expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should check both the object instance (expectedItem) and the property (expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount) as either may fail:

string x = expectedItem != null && expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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1  
I'm picking this one because it checks both the object and its property and I like this syntax style –  starvingPhilosopher Aug 28 '12 at 23:43
    
really? I find reading multiple nested ternary operators hard on the eyes. –  FlavorScape Aug 30 '12 at 1:26
    
@FlavorScape, I agree, but I wrote it in the same fashion as the OP posted in the question. –  series0ne Aug 30 '12 at 8:21
    
@FlavorScape, Which of the styles in the answers would you use or do you have a specific style to share? Thanks in advance –  starvingPhilosopher Aug 30 '12 at 19:19
    
@activwerx Which of the styles in the answers would you use or do you have a specific style to share? Thanks in advance –  starvingPhilosopher Aug 30 '12 at 19:19

You need to check if expectedItem is not null, not its property

string x = expectedItem != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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1  
should the op not check both the object instance and its property? see my answer. –  series0ne Aug 28 '12 at 23:33
    
@activwerx: if they should - they will find this out soon ;-) Doing mistakes is the best way to learn –  zerkms Aug 28 '12 at 23:34

Your expectation is wrong. try

string x = expectedItem == null ? "" : expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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+1 same as the selected answer, and you were first by several minutes –  psubsee2003 Aug 28 '12 at 23:48

expcetedItem is no doubt null:

string x;

if (expectedItem != null)
    x = expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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The short answer: you're dereferencing expectedItem because you're checking expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount for null rather than checking expectedItem itself. You should probably write

string x = expectedItem != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
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expectedItem is null.

if( expectedItem != null)
  x = expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";
else 
  x = "poop";
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2  
You can't say if (expecteditem) in C#; you have to explicitly compare it to null. –  Robert Harvey Aug 28 '12 at 23:25

Try this

string x = expectedItem != null && expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null
    ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount
    : string.Empty;
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The right way to write your code is as follows:

string x = expectedItem != null ? (expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "") : "";

You first have to make sure expectedItem is not null, if it is you would have an illegal operation called null pointer; you should then assign x an empty string.

If it is not null, and you write it like this

string x = expectedItem != null ? expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount : "";

x could be either null or expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount, if you don't want x to be null, for instance, you would make string operations on it later such as Compare or Concat, you should also make sure its member ExpectedResultAmount is not null either.

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As it has been suggested the the accepted answer is "not easy on the eye", you might also consider this:

string x = ""; //string is empty...
if (expectedItem != null && expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount != null)
{
    x = expectedItem.ExpectedResultAmount; //...unless this exists.
}
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It may be a 5 line (as opposed to my 1 line) solution, but it's very easy to read! –  series0ne Aug 30 '12 at 19:35

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