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Had tried following code in Linux, but always return 'C' under different LANG settings.

#include <iostream>
#include <locale.h>
#include <locale>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout<<"locale 1: "<<setlocale(LC_ALL, NULL)<<endl;
    cout<<"locale 2: "<<setlocale(LC_CTYPE, NULL)<<endl;

    locale l;
    cout<<"locale 3: "<<l.name()<<endl;
}

$ ./a.out
locale 1: C
locale 2: C
locale 3: C
$
$ export LANG=zh_CN.UTF-8
$ ./a.out
locale 1: C
locale 2: C
locale 3: C

What should I do to get current locale setting in Linux(like Ubuntu)?

Another question is, is it the same way to get locale in Windows?

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4  
In C and C++ the locale always starts out as the "C" locale. You have to specifically ask for the program's locale to be changed to the environment's locale. –  bames53 Aug 29 '12 at 23:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

From man 3 setlocale (New maxim: "When in doubt, read the entire manpage."):

If locale is "", each part of the locale that should be modified is set according to the environment variables.

So, we can read the environment variables by calling setlocale at the beginning of the program, as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <locale.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
    cout << "LC_ALL: " << setlocale(LC_ALL, NULL) << endl;
    cout << "LC_CTYPE: " << setlocale(LC_CTYPE, NULL) << endl;
    return 0;
}

My system does not support the zh_CN locale, as the following output reveals:

$ ./a.out 
LC_ALL: en_US.utf8
LC_CTYPE: en_US.utf8
$ export LANG=zh_CN.UTF-8
$ ./a.out 
LC_ALL: C
LC_CTYPE: C

Windows: I have no idea about Windows locales. I suggest starting with an MSDN search, and then opening a separate Stack Overflow question if you still have questions.

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Thanks. Is there a C++ version of getting current locale? I assume it should be in <locale> but have no idea how to use it. –  Deqing Aug 29 '12 at 4:57
1  
@Deqing: I have no idea. Search for documentation. google.com/search?q=c%2B%2B+locale –  Dietrich Epp Aug 29 '12 at 5:26

Just figured out how to get locale by C++, simply use an empty string "" to construct std::locale, which does the same thing as setlocale(LC_ALL, "").

locale l("");
cout<<"Locale by C++: "<<l.name()<<endl;

This link described differences in details between C locale and C++ locale.

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