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Our app currently works like this:

class myClass{

    private $names = array();

    function getNames($ids = array()){
         $lookup = array();

         foreach($ids as $id)
             if (!isset($this->names[$id]))
                $lookup[] = $id;

         if(!empty($lookup)){
              $result;//query database for names where id in $lookup
                      // now contains associative array of id => name pairs
              $this->names = array_merge($this->names, $result);
         }

         $result = array();
         foreach($ids as $id)
             $result[$id] = $this->names[$id];

         return $result;
    }
}

Which works fine, except it can still (and often does) result in several queries (400+ in this instance).

So, I am thinking of simply querying the database and populating the $this->names array with every name from the database.

But I am concerned about how many entries in the database I should start worrying about memory when doing this? (database column is varchar(100))

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1  
How much memory do you have? And how many concurrent users does your service generally support during peak access times? These are pertinent pieces of information. Without them any answer is useless. Generally, this is a question easily solved by load testing. Then, find the bottlenecks and optimize. Until then, just make it work (within reason). –  rdlowrey Aug 29 '12 at 4:22
    
If the question was taken in a general "Open Source Software for Distribution" (e.g. A blog Software) sense how would you approach it? –  Hailwood Aug 29 '12 at 4:24
    
Please see: php.net/manual/en/function.memory-get-peak-usage.php . Look at the first contributed note. –  Mark Garcia Aug 29 '12 at 4:24
    
Read this article How big are PHP arrays (and values) really?. Perhaps it will help you. –  khomyakoshka Aug 29 '12 at 4:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How much memory do you have? And how many concurrent users does your service generally support during peak access times? These are pertinent pieces of information. Without them any answer is useless. Generally, this is a question easily solved by load testing. Then, find the bottlenecks and optimize. Until then, just make it work (within reason).

But ...

If you really want an idea of what you're looking at ...

If we assume you aren't storing multibyte characters, you have 400 names * 100 chars (assume every name maxes your char limit) ... you're looking at ~40Kb of memory. Seems way too insignificant to worry about, doesn't it?

Obviously you'll get other overhead from PHP to hold the datastructure itself. Could you store things more efficiently using a data structure like SplFixedArray instead of a plain array? Probably -- but then you're losing the highly optimized array_* functions that you'd otherwise have to manipulate the list.

Will the user be using every one of the entries you're planning to buffer in memory? If you have to have them for your application it doesn't really matter how big they are, does it? It's not a good idea to keep lots of information you don't need in memory "just because." One thing you definitely don't want to do is query the database for 4000 records on every page load. At the very least you'd need to put those types of transactions into a memory store like memcached or use APC.

This question -- like most questions in computer science -- is simply a constrained maximization problem. It can't be solved correctly unless you know the variables at your disposal.

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And if we have 4000 entries in the table? then should we think twice? –  Hailwood Aug 29 '12 at 4:32

Once you get over a thousand items or so keyed look ups start to get really slow (there is a delay when you access a specific key). You can fix that with ksort(). (I saw a script go from 15min run time down to under 2 mins just by adding a ksort)

Other then that you are really only limited by memory.

A better way would be to build an array of missing data in your script and then fetch them all in one query using an IN list.

You really shouldn't waste memory storing data the user will never see if you can help it.

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