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I found this code in a RailsCast:

def tag_names
  @tag_names || tags.map(&:name).join(' ')
end

what does the (&:name) in map(&:name) mean?

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53  
I have heard this called “pretzel colon”, by the way. –  Josh Lee Oct 7 '10 at 20:40
2  
Haha. I know that as an Ampersand. I have never heard it called a "pretzel" but that makes sense. –  DragonFax Feb 18 '13 at 21:51
1  
Also you can drop out the brackets tags.map &:name for the extra shortest entry. –  itsnikolay Jun 10 '13 at 7:40
28  
Calling it "pretzel colon" is misleading, although catchy. There is no "&:" in ruby. The ampersand (&) is a "unary ampersand operator" with a pushed together :symbol. If anything, it's a "pretzel symbol". Just saying. –  fontno Jul 2 '13 at 3:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 228 down vote accepted

It's shorthand for tags.map(&:name.to_proc).join(' ')

If foo is an object with a to_proc method, then you can pass it to a method as &foo, which will call foo.to_proc and use that as the method's block.

The Symbol#to_proc method was originally added by ActiveSupport but has been integrated into Ruby 1.8.7. This is its implementation:

class Symbol
  def to_proc
    Proc.new do |obj, *args|
      obj.send self, *args
    end
  end
end
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21  
This is a better answer than mine. –  Oliver N. Aug 1 '09 at 18:02
47  
tags.map(:name.to_proc) is itself a shorthand for tags.map { |tag| tag.name } –  Simone Carletti Aug 1 '09 at 18:05
4  
this isn't valid ruby code, you still need the &, i.e tags.map(&:name.to_proc).join(' ') –  banister Jun 25 '11 at 13:00
5  
Symbol#to_proc is implemented in C, not in Ruby, but that's what it'd look like in Ruby. –  Andrew Grimm Jul 4 '11 at 2:46
4  
@AndrewGrimm it was first added in Ruby on Rails, using that code. It was then added as a native ruby feature in version 1.8.7. –  Cameron Martin Feb 13 '13 at 19:13

Another cool shorthand, unknown to many, is

array.each(&method(:foo))

which is a shorthand for

array.each { |element| foo(element) }

EDIT

By calling method(:foo) we took a Method object from self that represents its foo method, and used the & to signify that it has a to_proc method that converts it into a Proc.

This is very useful when you want to do things point-free style. An example is to check if there is any string in an array that is equal to the string "foo". There is the conventional way:

["bar", "baz", "foo"].any? { |str| str == "foo" }

And there is the point-free way:

["bar", "baz", "foo"].any?(&"foo".method(:==))

The preferred way should be the most readable one.

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13  
array.each{|e| foo(e)} is shorter still :-) +1 anyways –  Jared Beck May 16 '12 at 5:13
3  
@JaredBeck Yeap! Shorter but not point-free :) –  Gerry Sep 30 '12 at 10:51
    
And it is surprisingly fast. –  Boris Stitnicky Jun 6 '13 at 6:57

It's equivalent to

def tag_names
  @tag_names || tags.map { |tag| tag.name }.join(' ')
end
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While let us also note that ampersand #to_proc magic can work with any class, not just Symbol. Many Rubyists choose to define #to_proc on Array class:

class Array
  def to_proc
    proc { |receiver| receiver.send *self }
  end
end

# And then...

[ 'Hello', 'Goodbye' ].map &[ :+, ' world!' ]
#=> ["Hello world!", "Goodbye world!"]
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Can you bit little more explain how this code works? please –  Arup Rakshit Jul 3 '13 at 4:50
3  
Ampersand & works by sending to_proc message on its operand, which, in the above code, is of Array class. And since I defined #to_proc method on Array, the line becomes [ 'Hello', 'Goodbye' ].map { |receiver| receiver.send( :+, ' world!' ) }. Does this answer your question? –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 10 '13 at 11:47
    
Super!!! Really like that example >D –  flyer88 Nov 2 '13 at 5:15

It's shorthand for tags.map { |tag| tag.name }.join(' ')

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Nope, it's in Ruby 1.8.7 and above. –  Chuck Aug 1 '09 at 17:41
    
Is it a simple idiom for map or Ruby always interpret the '&' in a particular way? –  collimarco Aug 1 '09 at 17:43
    
@Chuck thanks, reverted for correctness. –  Oliver N. Aug 1 '09 at 17:49
7  
@collimarco: As jleedev says in his answer, the unary & operator calls to_proc on its operand. So it's not specific to the map method, and in fact works on any method that takes a block and passes one or more arguments to the block. –  Chuck Aug 1 '09 at 18:11

Josh Lee's answer is almost correct except that the equivalent Ruby code should have been as follows.

class Symbol
  def to_proc
    Proc.new do |receiver|
      receiver.send self
    end
  end
end

not

class Symbol
  def to_proc
    Proc.new do |obj, *args|
      obj.send self, *args
    end
  end
end

With this code, when print [[1,'a'],[2,'b'],[3,'c']].map(&:first) is executed, Ruby splits the first input [1,'a'] into 1 and 'a' to give obj 1 and args* 'a' to cause an error as Fixnum object 1 does not have the method self (which is :first).


When [[1,'a'],[2,'b'],[3,'c']].map(&:first) is executed;

  1. :first is a Symbol object, so when &:first is given to a map method as a parameter, Symbol#to_proc is invoked.

  2. map sends call message to :first.to_proc with parameter [1,'a'], e.g., :first.to_proc.call([1,'a']) is executed.

  3. to_proc procedure in Symbol class sends a send message to an array object ([1,'a']) with parameter (:first), e.g., [1,'a'].send(:first) is executed.

  4. iterates over the rest of the elements in [[1,'a'],[2,'b'],[3,'c']] object.

This is the same as executing [[1,'a'],[2,'b'],[3,'c']].map(|e| e.first) expression.

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Josh Lee's answer is absolutely correct, as you can see by thinking about [1,2,3,4,5,6].inject(&:+) - inject expects a lambda with two parameters (memo and item) and :+.to_proc delivers it - Proc.new |obj, *args| { obj.send(self, *args) } or { |m, o| m.+(o) } –  Uri Agassi May 20 at 4:18

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