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Base structures:

struct Foo{
    typedef int inner_type;
};

template<class T>
struct Bar{
    typename T::inner_type x;
};

In main:

Bar<Foo>();  // Compiles OK
Bar<Foo*>(); // Doesn't compile: template T becomes a pointer-to-class and is not a valid class anymore. 

How to work around this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Specialize the Bar struct for a pointer-to-T type:

//non-specialized template for generic type T
template<class T>
struct Bar{
    typename T::inner_type x;
};

//specialization for pointer-to-T types
template<class T>
struct Bar<T*>{
    typename T::inner_type x;
};
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Perfect! Fast answer thank you :) –  Patric Aug 29 '12 at 6:14
    
This wouldn't work. What if I write Bar<Foo***> bar;? –  Nawaz Aug 29 '12 at 6:46
    
At that point you'd have to use a recursive method to strip off the pointers and get the original type T, but that wasn't what the OP was requesting, so I didn't go that far with my answer. Obviously with templates you can create something that is "complete" to cover every corner case, but typically the code is also significantly more complex. The nice thing about the complexity is that it can be inductively proved, but still, why whip out a jack-hammer when you only need a screw-driver? My answer is a screw-driver answer to what I feel is a screw-driver-level question by the OP. –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 12:45

If you needed to do this in a situation where specializing the template would be awkward, you could also compute the type to use with some appropriate templates:

template<class T> struct remove_all_pointers {
    typedef T type;
};
template<class T> struct remove_all_pointers<T*> {
    typedef typename remove_all_pointers<T>::type type;
};
template<class T> struct remove_all_pointers<T* const> {
    typedef typename remove_all_pointers<T>::type type;
};
template<class T> struct remove_all_pointers<T* volatile> {
    typedef typename remove_all_pointers<T>::type type;
};
template<class T> struct remove_all_pointers<T* const volatile> {
    typedef typename remove_all_pointers<T>::type type;
};

struct Foo {
    typedef int inner_type;
};

template<class T>
struct Bar {
    typename remove_all_pointers<T>::type::inner_type x;
};
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3  
Probably worth mentioning C++11's std::remove_pointer. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 6:24
1  
@juanchopanza: remove_pointer doesn't do what is required (as far as I can tell), because it does not recursively remove pointers (not that the exact requirements are particularly clear from the question). But who knows... it could be just the thing Patric is looking for. –  Mankarse Aug 29 '12 at 6:27
    
Wouldn't something like typename remove_ptr<T>::type::inner_type x; in Bar do the trick? Unfortunately I cannot test this right now... –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 6:30
    
Just tested it, it seems to work fine (gcc 4.8 snapshot). –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 6:33
1  
@juanchopanza: That won't work for Bar<Foo**>(). –  Mankarse Aug 29 '12 at 6:36

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