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As per my knowledge, enum can be used like

typedef enum
{
   true,
   false,
   undefined    
}FLAGS;

true and false can be used like

int a = 1;
if(a == true)
   ....
else if(a == false)
   ....

Coming to my issue, I came across a enum usage like,

FLAGS Options[] = {true, undefined};

i.e array is declared of type enum. I have no idea. Please clarify me.

Edit:: What will happen in the mentioned scenario.

prinf("\n true:%d, false:%d, undefined:%d\n", true, false, undefined);

true: 0, false:1, undefined: 2

why?

Edit 2:: How it differs with int Options[] = {true, undefined};

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2  
About what exactly don't you have any idea? –  user529758 Aug 29 '12 at 7:02
    
Options is an array of two values of type FLAGS. –  dystroy Aug 29 '12 at 7:03
    
Would you mind giving further explanation ? –  Kijan Aug 29 '12 at 7:03
    
using enum as array. what it will do in this mentioned case. –  Jeyaram Aug 29 '12 at 7:03
2  
int Options[] and FLAGS Options[] only differ in the type of the array. Both are allowed, as enum values are convertible to int. (But note that having true==0 and false==1 will confuse everyone, because normally it is the other way around). –  Bo Persson Aug 29 '12 at 7:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An enum is just like an integer type, with the added bonus of having a bunch of named literals. There's nothing stopping you from declaring an array of enumerated values, it's basically just an array of integers.

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That code is perectly fine. You can make an array of any type -- here you declared an array of two elements, each of which is of type enum FLAGS.

Edit: you seem to be confused about the meaning of "undefined". It's not technically an undefined value, nor a reserved keyword in C. Thar's just 2 in this case.

What will happen in the mentioned scenario.

prinf("\n true:%d, false:%d, undefined:%d\n", true, false, undefined);

This will print the following:

true:0, false:1, undefined:2
share|improve this answer
    
as per sequence, true should be 0 right? –  Jeyaram Aug 29 '12 at 7:10
1  
@rjayavrp right, fixed. Weird enough definition. –  user529758 Aug 29 '12 at 7:11

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