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I am trying to search for a particular occurrence of a string in some files belonging to a directory. (The search is also performed in the sub directories. Currently, I came up with a solution something like this.

  1. Get all filenames inside a directory and its sub directories.
  2. Open files one by one.
  3. Search for a particular string
  4. If it contains, store filename in an array.
  5. Continue this till the last file.

    string[] fileNames = Directory.GetFiles(@"d:\test", "*.txt", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
    foreach (string sTem in fileNames)
    {
        foreach (string line in File.ReadAllLines(sTem))
        {
            if (line.Contains(SearchString))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Found search string!");
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    

I think there can be other methods/approach efficient and speeder than this? Using a batch file? OK. Another, solution is to use findstr (but how to use it directly with C# program without a batch file ? What is the most efficient (or more efficient than what I did?) Code examples are much appreciated!

Found out another solution.

Process myproc = new Process();
myproc.StartInfo.FileName = "findstr";
myproc.StartInfo.Arguments = "/m /s /d:\"c:\\REQs\" \"madhuresh\" *.req";
myproc.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
myproc.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;


myproc.Start();
string output = myproc.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
myproc.WaitForExit();

Is this execution of a process good ? Comments on this too are welcome!

According to the @AbitChev's method, a sleek (I don't know if it's efficient!). Anyways, it goes on like this. This one searches all the directory as well as the subdirectories!

IEnumerable<string> s = from file in Directory.EnumerateFiles("c:\\directorypath", "*.req", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                   from str in File.ReadLines(file)
                   //where str.Contains("Text@tosearched2")
                   where str.IndexOf(sSearchItem, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0
                   select file;

        foreach (string sa in s)
            MessageBox.Show(sa);

(for case-insensitive search. Maybe that could help someone.) Please comment! Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
File.ReadAllLines loads the whole file into memory, as long as it fits. –  Jodrell Aug 29 '12 at 7:56
    
Yes I know that Jodrell. So, whats the next available way ? an efficient way ofcourse! –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 7:59
    
Also you can download and run Win32 port of GNU Grep –  abatishchev Aug 29 '12 at 8:28
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about somthing like this

var found = false;
string file;

foreach (file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(
            "d:\\tes\\",
            "*.txt",
            SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
    foreach(var line in File.ReadLines(file))
    {
        if (line.Contains(searchString))
        {
            found = ture;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (found)
    {
            break;
    }
}

if (found)
{
    var message = string.Format("Search string found in \"{0}\".", file)
    MessageBox.Show(file);
}

This has the advantage of loading only what is required into memory, rather than the names of all the files then, the contents of each file.


I note you are using String.Contains which

performs an ordinal (case-sensitive and culture-insensitive) comparison

This would allow us to do a simple charachter wise compare.

I'd start with a little helper function

private static bool CompareCharBuffers(
    char[] buffer,
    int headPosition,
    char[] stringChars)
{
    // null checking and length comparison ommitted

    var same = true;
    var bufferPos = headPosition;
    for (var i = 0; i < stringChars.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!stringChars[i].Equals(buffer[bufferPos]))
        {
            same = false;
            break;
        }

        bufferPos = ++bufferPos % (buffer.Length - 1);
    }

    return same;
}

Then I'd alter the previous algorithm to use the function like this.

var stringChars = searchString.ToCharArray();
var found = false;
string file;


foreach (file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(
            "d:\\tes\\",
            "*.txt",
            SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
    using (var reader = File.OpenText(file))
    {
        var buffer = new char[stringChars.Length];
        if (reader.ReadBlock(buffer, 0, buffer.Length - 1) 
                < stringChars.Length - 1)
        {
            continue;
        }

        var head = 0;
        var nextPos = buffer.Length - 1;
        var nextChar = reader.Read();
        while (nextChar != -1)
        {
            buffer[nextPos] = (char)nextChar;

            if (CompareCharBuffers(buffer, head, stringChars))
            {
               found = ture;
               break;
            }

            head = ++head % (buffer.Length - 1);
            if (head == 0)
            {
                nextPos = buffer.Length - 1;
            }
            else
            {
                nextPos = head - 1;
            } 

            nextChar = reader.Read();
        }

        if (found)
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}

if (found)
{
    var message = string.Format("Search string found in \"{0}\".", file)
    MessageBox.Show(file);
}

this holds only as many chars as the search string contains in memory and uses rolling buffer across each file. Theoretically the file could contain no new lines and consume your whole disk, or, your search string could contain a new line.


As further work I'd convert the per file part of the algorithm into a function and investigate a multi-threaded approach.

So this would be the internal function,

static bool FileContains(string file, char[] stringChars)
{
    using (var reader = File.OpenText(file))
    {
        var buffer = new char[stringChars.Length];
        if (reader.ReadBlock(buffer, 0, buffer.Length - 1) 
                < stringChars.Length - 1)
        {
            return false;
        }

        var head = 0;
        var nextPos = buffer.Length - 1;
        var nextChar = reader.Read();
        while (nextChar != -1)
        {
            buffer[nextPos] = (char)nextChar;

            if (CompareCharBuffers(buffer, head, stringChars))
            {
               return true;
            }

            head = ++head % (buffer.Length - 1);
            if (head == 0)
            {
                nextPos = buffer.Length - 1;
            }
            else
            {
                nextPos = head - 1;
            } 

            nextChar = reader.Read();
        }

        return false;
    }
}

Then you could process the files in parallel like this

var stringChars = searchString.ToCharArray();

if (Directory.EnumerateFiles(
            "d:\\tes\\",
            "*.txt",
            SearchOption.AllDirectories)
    .AsParallel()
    .Any(file => FileContains(file, stringChars)))
{
    MessageBox.Show("Found search string!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems good! Loading only what is required to memory! has some advanta –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 8:25
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed. I've added a bit about multi-threading –  Jodrell Aug 29 '12 at 9:42
2  
AsParallel() is a great finding! –  abatishchev Aug 29 '12 at 9:47
add comment

Use Directory.EnumerateFiles() and File.ReadLines() - both provides lazy loading of data:

from file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(path)
from arr in File.ReadLines(file)
from str in arr
where str.Contains(pattern)
select new 
{
    FileName = file, // file containing matched string
    Line = str // matched string
};

or

foreach (var file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(path).AsParallel())
{
    try
    {
        foreach (var arr in File.ReadLines(file).AsParallel())
        {
            // one more try here?
            foreach (var str in arr)
            {
                if (str.Contains(pattern))
                {
                    yield return new 
                    {
                        FileName = file, // file containing matched string
                        Line = str // matched string
                    };
                }
            }
        }
    }
    catch (SecurityException)
    {
        // swallow or log
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Kind of sleek code! testing out now! thanks abastishchev! –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 8:25
    
Thanks Abatish. But, str is in format of IEnumerable. Sorry to ask this.I am a newbie. How about converting it in to a string or string array ? –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 8:38
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed: I've updated my answer. –  abatishchev Aug 29 '12 at 8:42
    
@AbatishChev.. a little edit in your code. It has to be select file; –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 8:49
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed: Sure, no problem, take a look at my new edit: you actually can select both. Also you can create a type to hold this information and return a collection of it from a searching method. –  abatishchev Aug 29 '12 at 9:07
show 8 more comments

You can create a "Pipeline" with Tasks.Dataflow (this .dll isn't currently part of .NET 4.5, but you can download it from here) to consume all files and searching for explicit strings. Take a look at this Reference Implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I ll check out varg. thanks. –  now he who must not be named. Aug 29 '12 at 8:54
    
note that this approach isn't really "file searching/reading" specific, but you can build a nice solution that runs several tasks in a cascading style. searching for files refers to reading files refers to store files in your favorite collection type. –  varg Aug 29 '12 at 9:01
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