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First of all, here's the code:

def check_sudoku(n):
    d=len(n)
    i=0
    s=1
    while i<d:
        print "i=",i
        while s<d:
            print "s=",s
            if n[0][i]==n[s][i]:
                return False
            s=s+1
            i=i+1
         return True 

what I want to do is that after the value of s changes from 1 to d, then it loops again and the value of i changes. But in my code the value of i is not changing at all.

Just to be clear of what I want to do, say

n =[[1,2,3,4],
    [2,3,1,3],
    [3,1,2,3],
    [4,4,4,4]]

i want the following to happen:

  • first it should check for

    n[0][0]==n[1][0]
    n[0][0]==n[2][0]
    n[0][0]==n[3][0]
    

    after that value of i should increase by 1

  • then it should go like this:

    n[0][1]==n[1][1]
    n[0][1]==n[2][1]
    n[0][1]==n[3][1]
    

after this value of i will increase again and this same loop will run.

This is not happening and I am not sure why. Please tell me what changes I should make to make it run the way I want to.

share|improve this question
    
Your indentation was messed up, and your last line (return True) will exit the outer loop early. Could you check if that shouldn't be dedented? Currently it'll actually give a indentation exception as it has one space more indentation than the inner while loop. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '12 at 8:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your inner loop increments s until it is greater than d, but you never set it back to 1. Also, with your current indentation, you also increment i in the inner loop, so it'll reach d inside the inner loop causing the outer loop to only be run once too.

So, if d is 4, your values will go:

i = 0, s = 1
i = 1, s = 2
i = 2, s = 3
# exit inner loop
return True

You'd be much better off using for loops using range(), avoiding your mistakes altogether:

def check_sudoku(n):
    for i in range(len(n)):
        for s in range(1, len(n)):
            if n[0][i]==n[s][i]:
                return False
    return True

With range the inner loop will always start at 1, range through to len(n) every time without explicit resets needed.

If you use the any() function you can collapse the whole test into one line:

def check_sudoku(n):
    return not any(n[0][i] == n[s][i] for i in range(len(n)) for s in range(1, len(n)))
share|improve this answer
    
I agree this solution is better, but the OP asked why his solution wasn't working. The answer to which is what @unwind said. –  Mike Vella Aug 29 '12 at 8:08
    
@MikeVella: actually, it goes a bit further than what unwind said; updated my answer to point out more problems (and why you'd want to use for loops then is even more obvious). I rather teach how to fish than just help catch the one.. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '12 at 8:11
    
Fair enough! upvoted –  Mike Vella Aug 29 '12 at 8:15
    
Thanks Martijn, your explanation about how "i" was already being incremented in the inner loop, really made it clear to me why it wasn't working the way I wanted it to. ofcourse, I would love a better way to do this, but I just wanted to get my concept clear about this loop and why it wasn't working. I dont want to make the same mistakes in the future and that's why wanted to get it all clear in my mind, before moving on to a better way. As for the indentation part, it seems like I keep making these sort of mistakes. would love some advice about indentations. –  faraz Aug 29 '12 at 10:50
    
Use a good editor, one that auto-indents for you. Configure it to use spaces, not tabs, set to 4 spaces. I use Sublime Text 2 myself. Perhaps use tools like pyflakes; my editor has a plugin that automates that for me (I see inline warnings, plugin is called SublimeLinter). –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '12 at 10:56

You don't reset s in the outer loop, so the inner loop will only execute once. After that, s < d will never be true again.

share|improve this answer

Further to unwind's answer, this is the modified code in a way that should work. I've changed the whitespace in the code and the operators in a way which most Python programmers will consider more conventional.

def check_sudoku(n):
    d = len(n)
    i = 0
    s = 1

    while i < d:
        print "i=",i
        while s < d:
            print "s=",s
            if n[0][i] == n[s][i]:
                return False
            s += 1
        i += 1
        s = 1
    return True 

n =[[1,2,3,4],
    [2,3,1,3],
    [3,1,2,3],
    [4,4,4,4]]

check_sudoku(n)
share|improve this answer

I think you should move the statement i=i+1 over the second loop follow as:

def check_sudoku(n):
d=len(n)
i=0
s=1
while i<d:
    print "i=",i
    while s<d:
        print "s=",s
        if n[0][i]==n[s][i]:
            return False
        s=s+1
    i=i+1
    return True
share|improve this answer
1  
Like the OP, you have your indentation messed up. Now the function will return True after one run through the outer loop. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '12 at 8:06
    
Moreover, you do not reset s, so it'll still only be executed once. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 29 '12 at 8:12

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